A Survey of Pesticide Accumulation in a Specialist Feeder, the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

A Survey of Pesticide Accumulation in a Specialist Feeder, the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) To maintain profitability in Australia’s agricultural and urban landscapes pesticides are used throughout the range of koala habitats. The koala is a specialist feeder, reliant on metabolic enzyme capacities to utilise a toxic diet of eucalypt leaves and is potentially prone to adverse effects when xenobiotic interactions between dietary and anthropogenic xenobiotics occur. The aim of this study was to investigate accumulation of frequently used pesticides in wild koalas in 4 areas of New South Wales and Queensland. Liver samples of 57 deceased koalas were collected from care facilities and analysed using a modified QuEChERS extraction method followed by GCMSMS, HRLCMS and LCMSMS. No accumulation of any of the 166 investigated pesticides was found. Data indicate hepatic accumulation of pesticides in this species is uncommon even with close interactions with intensive land use. Despite the lack of hepatic bioaccumulation, this study cannot exclude a direct effect on hepatocellular metabolic pathways. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology Springer Journals

A Survey of Pesticide Accumulation in a Specialist Feeder, the Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus)

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Environment; Pollution, general; Environmental Health; Ecotoxicology; Soil Science & Conservation; Environmental Chemistry; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0007-4861
eISSN
1432-0800
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00128-017-2140-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To maintain profitability in Australia’s agricultural and urban landscapes pesticides are used throughout the range of koala habitats. The koala is a specialist feeder, reliant on metabolic enzyme capacities to utilise a toxic diet of eucalypt leaves and is potentially prone to adverse effects when xenobiotic interactions between dietary and anthropogenic xenobiotics occur. The aim of this study was to investigate accumulation of frequently used pesticides in wild koalas in 4 areas of New South Wales and Queensland. Liver samples of 57 deceased koalas were collected from care facilities and analysed using a modified QuEChERS extraction method followed by GCMSMS, HRLCMS and LCMSMS. No accumulation of any of the 166 investigated pesticides was found. Data indicate hepatic accumulation of pesticides in this species is uncommon even with close interactions with intensive land use. Despite the lack of hepatic bioaccumulation, this study cannot exclude a direct effect on hepatocellular metabolic pathways.

Journal

Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and ToxicologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 15, 2017

References

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