A Review on Remote Sensing of Weeds in Agriculture

A Review on Remote Sensing of Weeds in Agriculture In the effort of developing precision agriculture tools, remote sensing has been commonly considered as an effective technique for weed patch delineation, where weed infestations are detected based on variations in the plant canopy spectral response. Because the canopy spectral response is important for weed detection, discussions on the irradiative interaction of light in plant canopies and the effect of variable soil background on the canopy spectral response are presented in this review. Also, a presentation of the current techniques for removal of soil effects, including vegetation indices and spectral mixture analysis, shows that these techniques have not been adequately developed for use in remote sensing-based weed detection applications. Given the nature of light interaction in a plant canopy, this review proposes that the spectral response of a plant canopy depends on both the species and the biomass density. Remote detection of weeds from ground-, aircraft-, and satellite-based platforms has been accomplished on a wide scale, yet the use of these weed detection methods to make variable-rate herbicide applications has not occurred as often. By judging success based on variable-rate herbicide applications rather than precise weed localization, some of the current problems in weed sensing may be skirted. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

A Review on Remote Sensing of Weeds in Agriculture

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11119-004-5321-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In the effort of developing precision agriculture tools, remote sensing has been commonly considered as an effective technique for weed patch delineation, where weed infestations are detected based on variations in the plant canopy spectral response. Because the canopy spectral response is important for weed detection, discussions on the irradiative interaction of light in plant canopies and the effect of variable soil background on the canopy spectral response are presented in this review. Also, a presentation of the current techniques for removal of soil effects, including vegetation indices and spectral mixture analysis, shows that these techniques have not been adequately developed for use in remote sensing-based weed detection applications. Given the nature of light interaction in a plant canopy, this review proposes that the spectral response of a plant canopy depends on both the species and the biomass density. Remote detection of weeds from ground-, aircraft-, and satellite-based platforms has been accomplished on a wide scale, yet the use of these weed detection methods to make variable-rate herbicide applications has not occurred as often. By judging success based on variable-rate herbicide applications rather than precise weed localization, some of the current problems in weed sensing may be skirted.

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 30, 2004

References

  • Assessment of weed density at an early stage by use of image processing
    Andreasen, C.; Rudemo, M.; Sevestre, S.

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