A review of the biology and ecology of key fishes targeted by coastal fisheries in south-east Australia: identifying critical knowledge gaps required to improve spatial management

A review of the biology and ecology of key fishes targeted by coastal fisheries in south-east... Knowledge of the population biology, life-history ecology and scales of pre and post-settlement movement of marine species are needed to inform effective conservation management strategies, particularly when spatial information is required for management purposes such as zoning in Marine Protected Areas. This review provides the most current summary from primary and grey literature on the biology and ecology of several coastal fishes of economic and ecological significance in south-east Australia; identifies key knowledge gaps which may impede the development of effective spatial management; and recommends future research directions and methods. Reviewed species are luderick (Girella tricuspidata), eastern rock blackfish (Girella elevata), yellowfin bream (Acanthopagrus australis), tarwhine (Rhabdosargus sarba), snapper (Pagrus auratus), red morwong (Cheilodactylus fuscus) and eastern blue grouper (Achoerodus viridis). The species have a diverse range of life-histories and population traits, and selected parameters were well studied in several species, such as growth (blue groper, luderick, yellowfin bream, tarwhine, snapper), post-settlement movement (red morwong), and larval ecology (yellowfin bream). However, empirical data on levels of pre- and post-settlement connectivity and real-time movements are not available for most species, and this represents a significant gap for improved spatial management. A multidisciplinary approach incorporating a range of methods including acoustic tracking and telemetry, otolith chemistry, intergenerational markers, and biophysical modelling will provide a more comprehensive understanding of life history parameters, movement and connectivity at scales relevant to MPA planning and monitoring. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

A review of the biology and ecology of key fishes targeted by coastal fisheries in south-east Australia: identifying critical knowledge gaps required to improve spatial management

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-013-9309-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Knowledge of the population biology, life-history ecology and scales of pre and post-settlement movement of marine species are needed to inform effective conservation management strategies, particularly when spatial information is required for management purposes such as zoning in Marine Protected Areas. This review provides the most current summary from primary and grey literature on the biology and ecology of several coastal fishes of economic and ecological significance in south-east Australia; identifies key knowledge gaps which may impede the development of effective spatial management; and recommends future research directions and methods. Reviewed species are luderick (Girella tricuspidata), eastern rock blackfish (Girella elevata), yellowfin bream (Acanthopagrus australis), tarwhine (Rhabdosargus sarba), snapper (Pagrus auratus), red morwong (Cheilodactylus fuscus) and eastern blue grouper (Achoerodus viridis). The species have a diverse range of life-histories and population traits, and selected parameters were well studied in several species, such as growth (blue groper, luderick, yellowfin bream, tarwhine, snapper), post-settlement movement (red morwong), and larval ecology (yellowfin bream). However, empirical data on levels of pre- and post-settlement connectivity and real-time movements are not available for most species, and this represents a significant gap for improved spatial management. A multidisciplinary approach incorporating a range of methods including acoustic tracking and telemetry, otolith chemistry, intergenerational markers, and biophysical modelling will provide a more comprehensive understanding of life history parameters, movement and connectivity at scales relevant to MPA planning and monitoring.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 19, 2013

References

  • Spatial variation and effects of habitat on temperate reef fish assemblages in northeastern New Zealand
    Anderson, MJ; Millar, RB

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