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A review of open-field host range testing to evaluate non-target use by herbivorous biological control candidates

A review of open-field host range testing to evaluate non-target use by herbivorous biological... One of the fundamental challenges of pre-release studies in classical biological weed control is to assess and predict the likelihood and consequences of non-target effects. Unless a candidate biological control agent is proven to be monophagous through conventional starvation and host-specificity tests in quarantine, open-field host range studies can be important in predicting the likelihood of non-target effects since they reveal the host selection of herbivores displaying the whole array of pre- and post-alightment behaviours. Over the course of its 53-year history, the purpose and the design of open-field host range studies have changed considerably, with more recent studies clarifying or refining specific questions related to one or a few test plant species and using a set design. We discuss the opportunities and challenges of this approach and suggest that future open-field host range studies should be more hypothesis-driven and apply different experimental designs that facilitate the interpretation of the results. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png BioControl Springer Journals

A review of open-field host range testing to evaluate non-target use by herbivorous biological control candidates

BioControl , Volume 63 (3) – Mar 5, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC)
Subject
Life Sciences; Entomology; Plant Pathology; Agriculture; Animal Ecology; Animal Biochemistry; Behavioral Sciences
ISSN
1386-6141
eISSN
1573-8248
DOI
10.1007/s10526-018-9875-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

One of the fundamental challenges of pre-release studies in classical biological weed control is to assess and predict the likelihood and consequences of non-target effects. Unless a candidate biological control agent is proven to be monophagous through conventional starvation and host-specificity tests in quarantine, open-field host range studies can be important in predicting the likelihood of non-target effects since they reveal the host selection of herbivores displaying the whole array of pre- and post-alightment behaviours. Over the course of its 53-year history, the purpose and the design of open-field host range studies have changed considerably, with more recent studies clarifying or refining specific questions related to one or a few test plant species and using a set design. We discuss the opportunities and challenges of this approach and suggest that future open-field host range studies should be more hypothesis-driven and apply different experimental designs that facilitate the interpretation of the results.

Journal

BioControlSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 5, 2018

References