A Perspective on the Potential Associations among Impulsivity, Palatable Food Intake, and Weight Gain in Pregnancy: Arguing a Need for Future Research

A Perspective on the Potential Associations among Impulsivity, Palatable Food Intake, and Weight... Purpose of Review This article aims to provide an initiative for future research to explore the relationships among impulsivity, palatable food intake, and gestational weight gain in pregnancy. Recent Findings Drawing from the extensive evidence linking impulsivity to a tendency towards palatable food intake and subsequent risk for weight gain and obesity in non-pregnant populations, it is argued that impulsivity may serve as an important maternal characteristic that augments risk for excessive gestational weight gain by promoting increased palatable food intake in and difficulty adhering to dietary guidelines for pregnancy. Summary Given the maternal and fetal health risks associated with excessive gestational weight gain, there is a need to better understand whether and how impulsivity, palatable food intake, and gestational weight gain interrelate in pregnancy to determine their potential clinical relevance. . . . Keywords Impulsivity Palatable food Pregnancy Gestational weight gain Introduction These prevention efforts have been relatively successful in promoting sustained health behavior change, such as Pregnancy is considered a powerful “teachable moment” smoking cessation [4], abstinence from drugs and alcohol for promoting health behavior change in women [1, 2� ]. [5], increased physical activity [6, 7], and improved dietary Phelan and colleagues [1] described pregnancy as http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Addiction Reports Springer Journals

A Perspective on the Potential Associations among Impulsivity, Palatable Food Intake, and Weight Gain in Pregnancy: Arguing a Need for Future Research

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry; Neurology
eISSN
2196-2952
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40429-018-0201-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review This article aims to provide an initiative for future research to explore the relationships among impulsivity, palatable food intake, and gestational weight gain in pregnancy. Recent Findings Drawing from the extensive evidence linking impulsivity to a tendency towards palatable food intake and subsequent risk for weight gain and obesity in non-pregnant populations, it is argued that impulsivity may serve as an important maternal characteristic that augments risk for excessive gestational weight gain by promoting increased palatable food intake in and difficulty adhering to dietary guidelines for pregnancy. Summary Given the maternal and fetal health risks associated with excessive gestational weight gain, there is a need to better understand whether and how impulsivity, palatable food intake, and gestational weight gain interrelate in pregnancy to determine their potential clinical relevance. . . . Keywords Impulsivity Palatable food Pregnancy Gestational weight gain Introduction These prevention efforts have been relatively successful in promoting sustained health behavior change, such as Pregnancy is considered a powerful “teachable moment” smoking cessation [4], abstinence from drugs and alcohol for promoting health behavior change in women [1, 2� ]. [5], increased physical activity [6, 7], and improved dietary Phelan and colleagues [1] described pregnancy as

Journal

Current Addiction ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: May 2, 2018

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