A major quantitative trait locus co-localizing with cholecystokinin type A receptor gene influences poor pancreatic proliferation in a spontaneously diabetogenic rat

A major quantitative trait locus co-localizing with cholecystokinin type A receptor gene... The Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat is an animal model for obese-type, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in humans. The OLETF rat has poor capacity for pancreatic proliferation, which may be the critical pathogenetic event in NIDDM development. Our investigation was designed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for poor pancreatic proliferation by examining compensatory proliferation of the pancreatic remnant after partial pancreatectomy and performing a genome-wide scan in an F2 intercross obtained by mating the OLETF and the Fischer-344 (F344) rats. We identified a highly significant QTL on rat Chromosome 14 with a maximum lod score of 16.7, which accounts for 55% of the total variance. The QTL co-localizes with the gene encoding cholecystokinin type A receptor (CCKAR) which is likely to mediate the trophic effect of cholecystokinin on pancreas and is defective in the OLETF rat. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

A major quantitative trait locus co-localizing with cholecystokinin type A receptor gene influences poor pancreatic proliferation in a spontaneously diabetogenic rat

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Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Springer-Verlag New York Inc.
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s003359900869
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rat is an animal model for obese-type, non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) in humans. The OLETF rat has poor capacity for pancreatic proliferation, which may be the critical pathogenetic event in NIDDM development. Our investigation was designed to identify quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for poor pancreatic proliferation by examining compensatory proliferation of the pancreatic remnant after partial pancreatectomy and performing a genome-wide scan in an F2 intercross obtained by mating the OLETF and the Fischer-344 (F344) rats. We identified a highly significant QTL on rat Chromosome 14 with a maximum lod score of 16.7, which accounts for 55% of the total variance. The QTL co-localizes with the gene encoding cholecystokinin type A receptor (CCKAR) which is likely to mediate the trophic effect of cholecystokinin on pancreas and is defective in the OLETF rat.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 1, 1998

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