A higher incidence of cleavage failure in oocytes containing smooth endoplasmic reticulum clusters

A higher incidence of cleavage failure in oocytes containing smooth endoplasmic reticulum clusters Purpose In human oocytes, sERCs are one of the dysmorphic phenotypes that have been reported. Significantly reduced pregnancy rates and a comparatively higher number of abnormities in live births appear to be associated with the presence of sERCs in oocytes. However, some reports have shown that healthy babies can be born, without any reduced pregnancy rates, from oocytes observed to contain sERCs. Thus, the clinical and scientific significance of oocytes that harbor sERCs remains controversial. Methods The presence of sERCs was evaluated using a time-lapse system while studying the dynamic changes within oocytes and embryos. Logistic regression analysis was carried out to explore the independent variables for meiotic and mitotic cleavage failure.. Results The incidence of mitotic cleavage failure and the incidence of meiotic cleavage failure during the second polar body extrusion in oocytes with sERCs were found to be significantly higher than that in oocytes without sERCs. Furthermore, ICSI was found to have a greater frequency of meiotic failure than IVF. Conclusions In cases of cleavage failure, an embryonic cell could become tetraploid and may induce abnormal chromosomal configurations. Some cells exposed to cleavage failure may become trophectoderm cells and form placental abnormalities. Even if they develop into http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics Springer Journals

A higher incidence of cleavage failure in oocytes containing smooth endoplasmic reticulum clusters

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Gynecology; Reproductive Medicine; Human Genetics
ISSN
1058-0468
eISSN
1573-7330
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10815-018-1119-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose In human oocytes, sERCs are one of the dysmorphic phenotypes that have been reported. Significantly reduced pregnancy rates and a comparatively higher number of abnormities in live births appear to be associated with the presence of sERCs in oocytes. However, some reports have shown that healthy babies can be born, without any reduced pregnancy rates, from oocytes observed to contain sERCs. Thus, the clinical and scientific significance of oocytes that harbor sERCs remains controversial. Methods The presence of sERCs was evaluated using a time-lapse system while studying the dynamic changes within oocytes and embryos. Logistic regression analysis was carried out to explore the independent variables for meiotic and mitotic cleavage failure.. Results The incidence of mitotic cleavage failure and the incidence of meiotic cleavage failure during the second polar body extrusion in oocytes with sERCs were found to be significantly higher than that in oocytes without sERCs. Furthermore, ICSI was found to have a greater frequency of meiotic failure than IVF. Conclusions In cases of cleavage failure, an embryonic cell could become tetraploid and may induce abnormal chromosomal configurations. Some cells exposed to cleavage failure may become trophectoderm cells and form placental abnormalities. Even if they develop into

Journal

Journal of Assisted Reproduction and GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 22, 2018

References

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