A gymnosperm ABI3 gene functions in a severe abscisic acid-insensitive mutant of Arabidopsis (abi3-6) to restore the wild-type phenotype and demonstrates a strong synergistic effect with sugar in the inhibition of post-germinative growth

A gymnosperm ABI3 gene functions in a severe abscisic acid-insensitive mutant of Arabidopsis... The CnABI3 gene of yellow-cedar is an orthologue of the ABI3/VP1 gene of angiosperms; it shares many common characteristics with other ABI3/VP1 genes, yet has unique characteristics as well. We examined whether this gymnosperm transcription factor can functionally complement an angiosperm species with a defective ABI3 gene. A severe Arabidopsis abi3 null mutant abi3-6 was stably transformed with the CnABI3 gene coding-region driven by a modified CaMV 35S promoter. Several of the visible mutant phenotypes (e.g., production of green seeds due to a lack of chlorophyll breakdown) were fully restored to those of the wild-type and the transformed seeds acquired desiccation tolerance. The functional complementation of the mutant also extended to the accumulation of several seed proteins (including seed-storage-proteins, α-tonoplast intrinsic protein, dehydrin-related polypeptides and oleosin), which were restored to wild-type levels. However, not all phenotypes were fully restored; sensitivities of transgenic seeds to exogenous ABA (as far as germination is concerned) were lower than that of the wild-type seeds, and flowering times were intermediate of those characteristic of wild-type and abi3-6 plants. A novel function for CnABI3, potentially related to a direct or indirect role in ER homeostasis was revealed. Two proteins with a molecular chaperone function in the ER (BiP and protein disulphide isomerase) were elevated in mutant seeds (indicative of ER stress); expression of the CnABI3 gene decreased the accumulation of these proteins to levels characteristic of the wild-type. These studies reveal the degree of conservation of ABI3 functions between gymnosperms and angiosperms as well as some novel functions of ABI3-related genes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

A gymnosperm ABI3 gene functions in a severe abscisic acid-insensitive mutant of Arabidopsis (abi3-6) to restore the wild-type phenotype and demonstrates a strong synergistic effect with sugar in the inhibition of post-germinative growth

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/a-gymnosperm-abi3-gene-functions-in-a-severe-abscisic-acid-insensitive-yx68atyGgK
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by Springer
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11103-004-4952-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The CnABI3 gene of yellow-cedar is an orthologue of the ABI3/VP1 gene of angiosperms; it shares many common characteristics with other ABI3/VP1 genes, yet has unique characteristics as well. We examined whether this gymnosperm transcription factor can functionally complement an angiosperm species with a defective ABI3 gene. A severe Arabidopsis abi3 null mutant abi3-6 was stably transformed with the CnABI3 gene coding-region driven by a modified CaMV 35S promoter. Several of the visible mutant phenotypes (e.g., production of green seeds due to a lack of chlorophyll breakdown) were fully restored to those of the wild-type and the transformed seeds acquired desiccation tolerance. The functional complementation of the mutant also extended to the accumulation of several seed proteins (including seed-storage-proteins, α-tonoplast intrinsic protein, dehydrin-related polypeptides and oleosin), which were restored to wild-type levels. However, not all phenotypes were fully restored; sensitivities of transgenic seeds to exogenous ABA (as far as germination is concerned) were lower than that of the wild-type seeds, and flowering times were intermediate of those characteristic of wild-type and abi3-6 plants. A novel function for CnABI3, potentially related to a direct or indirect role in ER homeostasis was revealed. Two proteins with a molecular chaperone function in the ER (BiP and protein disulphide isomerase) were elevated in mutant seeds (indicative of ER stress); expression of the CnABI3 gene decreased the accumulation of these proteins to levels characteristic of the wild-type. These studies reveal the degree of conservation of ABI3 functions between gymnosperms and angiosperms as well as some novel functions of ABI3-related genes.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 24, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off