A Gift Grows in the Ghetto: Reimagining the Spiritual Diagnosis of Black Men

A Gift Grows in the Ghetto: Reimagining the Spiritual Diagnosis of Black Men This essay explores the spiritual diagnosis of Black men in the American ghetto. The ghetto is viewed as a place of desolation, a place where nothing of value thrives—quite simply, a place where it is hard to grow. But is it also something more? By using the biblical story of Hagar and her son Ishmael being abandoned in the wilderness, the author argues that it is within deleterious environs, whether the wilderness or the ghetto, that one’s gift is discovered and then, through divine assistance, allowed to develop. This offers a useful tool in terms of spiritual diagnosis, especially for Black men, because one of the main criteria to be assessed becomes the person’s awareness of his gift and how the gift is being developed. In the end, Black men are encouraged to become more aware of their specific gift and the ways in which this gift, when properly cared for, develops—i.e., grows up—in such a way that it protects them, above all, in an uncaring environment. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pastoral Psychology Springer Journals

A Gift Grows in the Ghetto: Reimagining the Spiritual Diagnosis of Black Men

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Psychology; Clinical Psychology; Religious Studies, general; Cross Cultural Psychology; Sociology, general
ISSN
0031-2789
eISSN
1573-6679
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11089-018-0804-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This essay explores the spiritual diagnosis of Black men in the American ghetto. The ghetto is viewed as a place of desolation, a place where nothing of value thrives—quite simply, a place where it is hard to grow. But is it also something more? By using the biblical story of Hagar and her son Ishmael being abandoned in the wilderness, the author argues that it is within deleterious environs, whether the wilderness or the ghetto, that one’s gift is discovered and then, through divine assistance, allowed to develop. This offers a useful tool in terms of spiritual diagnosis, especially for Black men, because one of the main criteria to be assessed becomes the person’s awareness of his gift and how the gift is being developed. In the end, Black men are encouraged to become more aware of their specific gift and the ways in which this gift, when properly cared for, develops—i.e., grows up—in such a way that it protects them, above all, in an uncaring environment.

Journal

Pastoral PsychologySpringer Journals

Published: Feb 6, 2018

References

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