A Further Improved Maximum Tangential Stress Criterion for Assessing Mode I Fracture of Rocks Considering Non-singular Stress Terms of the Williams Expansion

A Further Improved Maximum Tangential Stress Criterion for Assessing Mode I Fracture of Rocks... Previous studies showed that the modified maximum tangential stress (MMTS) criterion considering two stress terms (con- −1/2 1/2 taining r and r ) of the well-known Williams series expansion can better assess the mode I fracture toughness (K ) of Ic rocks than the traditional maximum tangential stress (MTS) criterion. However, this study indicates that in some cases, only using the two stress terms cannot fully describe the tangential stress at the critical distance for rock specimens, and the higher order, non-singular stress terms can also play important roles in the tangential stress. The MMTS fracture criterion might still induce non-negligible errors for assessing mode I rock fracture. Thus, we propose a further improved MTS (FIMTS) criterion. The FIMTS criterion emphasizes that the number of non-singular stress terms used in a MTS-based criterion should be carefully chosen according to the following principle: the tangential stress at the critical distance can be accurately described using the selected stress terms. Mode I fracture tests on two kinds of rocks are conducted using a newly proposed V-notched short rod bend (VNSRB) specimen. The specimen- or loading-configuration-dependence of K indicated by the Ic experimental data is theoretically assessed using the traditional MTS, the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering Springer Journals

A Further Improved Maximum Tangential Stress Criterion for Assessing Mode I Fracture of Rocks Considering Non-singular Stress Terms of the Williams Expansion

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Earth Sciences; Geophysics/Geodesy; Civil Engineering
ISSN
0723-2632
eISSN
1434-453X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00603-018-1524-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous studies showed that the modified maximum tangential stress (MMTS) criterion considering two stress terms (con- −1/2 1/2 taining r and r ) of the well-known Williams series expansion can better assess the mode I fracture toughness (K ) of Ic rocks than the traditional maximum tangential stress (MTS) criterion. However, this study indicates that in some cases, only using the two stress terms cannot fully describe the tangential stress at the critical distance for rock specimens, and the higher order, non-singular stress terms can also play important roles in the tangential stress. The MMTS fracture criterion might still induce non-negligible errors for assessing mode I rock fracture. Thus, we propose a further improved MTS (FIMTS) criterion. The FIMTS criterion emphasizes that the number of non-singular stress terms used in a MTS-based criterion should be carefully chosen according to the following principle: the tangential stress at the critical distance can be accurately described using the selected stress terms. Mode I fracture tests on two kinds of rocks are conducted using a newly proposed V-notched short rod bend (VNSRB) specimen. The specimen- or loading-configuration-dependence of K indicated by the Ic experimental data is theoretically assessed using the traditional MTS, the

Journal

Rock Mechanics and Rock EngineeringSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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