A comparative study on dual modification of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch by microwave irradiation and cross-linking

A comparative study on dual modification of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch by microwave... Effect of dual modification by cross-linking with POCl3 (0.05 and 0.1%) and microwave irradiation (90 and 180 s) on the properties of banana starch was investigated. The degree of cross-linking was increased with an increased concentration of phosphorous oxychloride and higher period of microwave irradiation. Dual modification had decreased the solubility, swelling index and water absorption capacity of the banana starch. With a higher degree of cross-linking the retrogradation properties and freeze–thaw stability found to be minimized in the modified starches. SEM micrographs displayed minor surface damages in the modified starches. FT-IR spectroscopy results indicate that the cross-linking reaction merely added some new groups to the starch chain and did not damage its underlying chemical structure. A type diffraction pattern was noticed in all starch samples and crystallinity of modified starches was reduced at higher microwave irradiation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Measurement and Characterization Springer Journals

A comparative study on dual modification of banana (Musa paradisiaca) starch by microwave irradiation and cross-linking

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Chemistry; Food Science; Chemistry/Food Science, general; Engineering, general
ISSN
1932-7587
eISSN
2193-4134
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11694-018-9837-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Effect of dual modification by cross-linking with POCl3 (0.05 and 0.1%) and microwave irradiation (90 and 180 s) on the properties of banana starch was investigated. The degree of cross-linking was increased with an increased concentration of phosphorous oxychloride and higher period of microwave irradiation. Dual modification had decreased the solubility, swelling index and water absorption capacity of the banana starch. With a higher degree of cross-linking the retrogradation properties and freeze–thaw stability found to be minimized in the modified starches. SEM micrographs displayed minor surface damages in the modified starches. FT-IR spectroscopy results indicate that the cross-linking reaction merely added some new groups to the starch chain and did not damage its underlying chemical structure. A type diffraction pattern was noticed in all starch samples and crystallinity of modified starches was reduced at higher microwave irradiation.

Journal

Journal of Food Measurement and CharacterizationSpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2018

References

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