13-Docosenamide release by bacteria in response to glucose during growth—fluorescein quenching and clinical application

13-Docosenamide release by bacteria in response to glucose during growth—fluorescein quenching... Our investigations on extracellular biochemical events to find readily and sensitively detectable/measurable molecular targets for developing easier, simpler, and quicker diagnostic methods and tools for bacterial pathogens led to the observation that bacteria grown in the presence of glucose produced a compound capable of quenching fluorescein. Under the experimental conditions, among various sugars, glucose was found to induce maximum amount of the quencher when Escherichia coli was grown in presence of 50 mM glucose in rarified LB. The release of quencher closely following bacterial growth significantly from fourth hour after moderate inoculation. This fluorescein-quencher was purified using TLC and HPLC and identified using GC-MS as 13-docosenamide or erucamide, originally known as plant lipid, is a neuroactive compound in human and animals. Fluorescence and UV-absorption spectral analysis showed that the compound formed stable adduct with fluorescein in the ground state. Commercial 13-docosonamide enabled quantitation of the compound produced in micromolar quantities during glucose utili- zation from the medium. Twenty-seven different commonly encountered bacteria, pathogens or otherwise, could produce the quencher. A simple microplate-based growth monitoring method was developed exploiting quenching as an easily and readily measurable signal, either using a reader or an imager. While 13-docosenamide release by bacteria may http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology Springer Journals

13-Docosenamide release by bacteria in response to glucose during growth—fluorescein quenching and clinical application

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Microbiology; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Biotechnology
ISSN
0175-7598
eISSN
1432-0614
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00253-018-9127-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Our investigations on extracellular biochemical events to find readily and sensitively detectable/measurable molecular targets for developing easier, simpler, and quicker diagnostic methods and tools for bacterial pathogens led to the observation that bacteria grown in the presence of glucose produced a compound capable of quenching fluorescein. Under the experimental conditions, among various sugars, glucose was found to induce maximum amount of the quencher when Escherichia coli was grown in presence of 50 mM glucose in rarified LB. The release of quencher closely following bacterial growth significantly from fourth hour after moderate inoculation. This fluorescein-quencher was purified using TLC and HPLC and identified using GC-MS as 13-docosenamide or erucamide, originally known as plant lipid, is a neuroactive compound in human and animals. Fluorescence and UV-absorption spectral analysis showed that the compound formed stable adduct with fluorescein in the ground state. Commercial 13-docosonamide enabled quantitation of the compound produced in micromolar quantities during glucose utili- zation from the medium. Twenty-seven different commonly encountered bacteria, pathogens or otherwise, could produce the quencher. A simple microplate-based growth monitoring method was developed exploiting quenching as an easily and readily measurable signal, either using a reader or an imager. While 13-docosenamide release by bacteria may

Journal

Applied Microbiology and BiotechnologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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