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Worse Than the Disease: Pitfalls of Medical Progress

Worse Than the Disease: Pitfalls of Medical Progress 238 Book Reviews By Diana B. Dutton (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988) Wtm'e Than the Disease is the result of a multidisciplinary research project at Stanford University. It is a well-written, stimulating, and carefully refer­ enced work in which the author and her two contributors, Thomas A. Preston and Nancy E. P£und, explore the influences of medical innovations on social, ethical, and economic dilemmas in American society. Dutton makes a compelling case for the general public's active participation in solving the problems engendered by technological innovations. She does this gradually, presenting the evolution of four cases in the second half of the twentieth century. Highlighted cases arc the development and use of synthetic estrogen or dietfiylstilbestrol (DES), of the artificial heart, of the Swine Flu immu­ nization program, and of genetic engineering. The author scrutinizes each case by examining violations of ethical principles, especially of autonomy and justice. She contends that the initial introductory phase of an innova­ tion fashions its future agendas. Expert opinion provided in the beginning of such a technological advance, she argues, creates a point of view that may become difficult to change later. Over an extended time period, for example, scientists and physicians http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Worse Than the Disease: Pitfalls of Medical Progress

Nursing History Review , Volume 2 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 1994

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.2.1.238
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

238 Book Reviews By Diana B. Dutton (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988) Wtm'e Than the Disease is the result of a multidisciplinary research project at Stanford University. It is a well-written, stimulating, and carefully refer­ enced work in which the author and her two contributors, Thomas A. Preston and Nancy E. P£und, explore the influences of medical innovations on social, ethical, and economic dilemmas in American society. Dutton makes a compelling case for the general public's active participation in solving the problems engendered by technological innovations. She does this gradually, presenting the evolution of four cases in the second half of the twentieth century. Highlighted cases arc the development and use of synthetic estrogen or dietfiylstilbestrol (DES), of the artificial heart, of the Swine Flu immu­ nization program, and of genetic engineering. The author scrutinizes each case by examining violations of ethical principles, especially of autonomy and justice. She contends that the initial introductory phase of an innova­ tion fashions its future agendas. Expert opinion provided in the beginning of such a technological advance, she argues, creates a point of view that may become difficult to change later. Over an extended time period, for example, scientists and physicians

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1994

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