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Working With Clients Who Opt to Use Marijuana as an Alternative Treatment for Chronic Health Conditions

Working With Clients Who Opt to Use Marijuana as an Alternative Treatment for Chronic Health... Background Marijuana as an alternative treatment for chronic illnesses has gained popularity over the past several years, and researchers continue to report positive outcomes for a growing number of disorders. Objective To address the increasing number of individuals with disabilities using medicinal marijuana, this study sought to ascertain how rehabilitation professionals (RPs) respond when working with individuals who use this form of treatment. for chronic health conditions. Methods RPs were presented with two case scenarios depicting clients who were either currently using or considering using marijuana and were asked what steps they would take when working with this individual. Options included (a) dismiss the client; (b) counsel the client against using; (c) refer client to a mental health professional; (d) meet with the employer; (e) consult with the physician who would recommend medical marijuana for your client; (f) consult your supervisor; (g) consult your agency's policy on drug use; and (h) review the code of ethics for your profession. Findings No significant results were noted in scenario 1, however, participants were more likely to consult those who could increase their understanding of medicinal marijuana andthose who could help support their work with these clients In scenario 2, participants were significantly more likely to select meeting with the clients' employer, which speaks to the primary focus of RPs' work—-helping clients obtain and maintain employment. Conclusion There are far reaching implications for our work as RPs, including serving as valuable resources for clients who do not typically seek out vocational rehabilitation services. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Research, Policy and Education Springer Publishing

Working With Clients Who Opt to Use Marijuana as an Alternative Treatment for Chronic Health Conditions

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2021 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
2168-6653
eISSN
2168-6661
DOI
10.1891/re-19-35
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Marijuana as an alternative treatment for chronic illnesses has gained popularity over the past several years, and researchers continue to report positive outcomes for a growing number of disorders. Objective To address the increasing number of individuals with disabilities using medicinal marijuana, this study sought to ascertain how rehabilitation professionals (RPs) respond when working with individuals who use this form of treatment. for chronic health conditions. Methods RPs were presented with two case scenarios depicting clients who were either currently using or considering using marijuana and were asked what steps they would take when working with this individual. Options included (a) dismiss the client; (b) counsel the client against using; (c) refer client to a mental health professional; (d) meet with the employer; (e) consult with the physician who would recommend medical marijuana for your client; (f) consult your supervisor; (g) consult your agency's policy on drug use; and (h) review the code of ethics for your profession. Findings No significant results were noted in scenario 1, however, participants were more likely to consult those who could increase their understanding of medicinal marijuana andthose who could help support their work with these clients In scenario 2, participants were significantly more likely to select meeting with the clients' employer, which speaks to the primary focus of RPs' work—-helping clients obtain and maintain employment. Conclusion There are far reaching implications for our work as RPs, including serving as valuable resources for clients who do not typically seek out vocational rehabilitation services.

Journal

Rehabilitation Research, Policy and EducationSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 10, 2020

References