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Work, Remuneration, and Negotiation for Pay in Early Adolescence: Exploring Early Causes of Gender Pay Inequity

Work, Remuneration, and Negotiation for Pay in Early Adolescence: Exploring Early Causes of... <p>Work and negotiation experiences were examined among early adolescents (12–15 years) through a survey (N = 157) and follow-up interview (N = 89) conducted in two Canadian cities. Key findings, based on a mixed-method research approach, were (a) gifts were the primary income source; (b) females completed more chores than males, and younger adolescents received payment for chores more than older adolescents; (c) discussion of negotiation rarely occurred between participants and parents or peers; (d) neither age nor gender impacted absence of negotiation; (e) those who had negotiated for more money reported satisfaction; (f) gender differences in negotiation strategies were present; and (g) age differences in beliefs about negotiator qualities were found. Consistencies and changes from extant literature were discussed.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning Springer Publishing

Work, Remuneration, and Negotiation for Pay in Early Adolescence: Exploring Early Causes of Gender Pay Inequity

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1052-3073
eISSN
1947-7910
DOI
10.1891/1052-3073.28.1.20
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<p>Work and negotiation experiences were examined among early adolescents (12–15 years) through a survey (N = 157) and follow-up interview (N = 89) conducted in two Canadian cities. Key findings, based on a mixed-method research approach, were (a) gifts were the primary income source; (b) females completed more chores than males, and younger adolescents received payment for chores more than older adolescents; (c) discussion of negotiation rarely occurred between participants and parents or peers; (d) neither age nor gender impacted absence of negotiation; (e) those who had negotiated for more money reported satisfaction; (f) gender differences in negotiation strategies were present; and (g) age differences in beliefs about negotiator qualities were found. Consistencies and changes from extant literature were discussed.</p>

Journal

Journal of Financial Counseling and PlanningSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2017

References