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Who Says “I Do”? Financial Resources and Values on Relationship Choices of Emerging Adults

Who Says “I Do”? Financial Resources and Values on Relationship Choices of Emerging Adults <p>This study examined potential impacts of financial resources and values on emerging adults' choice in committed relationships (<italic>N</italic> = 424, 26–35 years). Guided by <xref>Deacon and Firebaugh's (1988)</xref> Family Resource Management theory, financial self-sufficiency and forming a committed relationship were conceptualized as two salient goals of emerging adulthood. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the effects of financial self-sufficiency, values, and personal background factors on choice of committed relationship status. Findings indicated that emerging adults with fewer financial resources chose to live apart; however, the effects of career values were a stronger predictor of their relationship status. In contrast, neither financial resources nor career values differentiated between cohabiting and married emerging adults.</p> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning Springer Publishing

Who Says “I Do”? Financial Resources and Values on Relationship Choices of Emerging Adults

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1052-3073
eISSN
1947-7910
DOI
10.1891/JFCP-19-00016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

<p>This study examined potential impacts of financial resources and values on emerging adults' choice in committed relationships (<italic>N</italic> = 424, 26–35 years). Guided by <xref>Deacon and Firebaugh's (1988)</xref> Family Resource Management theory, financial self-sufficiency and forming a committed relationship were conceptualized as two salient goals of emerging adulthood. Multinomial logistic regression was used to determine the effects of financial self-sufficiency, values, and personal background factors on choice of committed relationship status. Findings indicated that emerging adults with fewer financial resources chose to live apart; however, the effects of career values were a stronger predictor of their relationship status. In contrast, neither financial resources nor career values differentiated between cohabiting and married emerging adults.</p>

Journal

Journal of Financial Counseling and PlanningSpringer Publishing

Published: Jun 24, 2020

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