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We Must Have Nurses: Spanish Influenza in America 1918–1919

We Must Have Nurses: Spanish Influenza in America 1918–1919 We Must Have Nurses Spanish Influenza in America 1918-1919 RHONDA KEEN- PAYNE Harris College of Nursing Texas Christian University Heralded as the Spanish Lady, she emptied church pews, school desks, and pool halls. She killed soldiers in trenches in France far more efficiently than any shell or mustard gas . For 10 months the Spanish Lady danced with partners around the world . She then disappeared ·as mysteriously as she came and was even more quickly forgotten. Against the backdrop of the deadly monotonous stalemate of World War I, an influenza type A virus was traveling through the populations of the world at speeds far in excess of a soldier's march, although the virus would certainly hitch a ride with him when possible. The virus was generous in its visitation, effective in its infestation, and accurate in its aim . In the 1920s estimates suggested that the flu killed at least twenty-two million people within 10 months. More recent analyses indicate that this estimate of mortality is quite low because data from large parts of China and Africa, were not included . The combined battle deaths of American soldiers in World Wars 1 and 2, Korea, and Vietnam total http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

We Must Have Nurses: Spanish Influenza in America 1918–1919

Nursing History Review , Volume 8 (1): 14 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.8.1.143
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We Must Have Nurses Spanish Influenza in America 1918-1919 RHONDA KEEN- PAYNE Harris College of Nursing Texas Christian University Heralded as the Spanish Lady, she emptied church pews, school desks, and pool halls. She killed soldiers in trenches in France far more efficiently than any shell or mustard gas . For 10 months the Spanish Lady danced with partners around the world . She then disappeared ·as mysteriously as she came and was even more quickly forgotten. Against the backdrop of the deadly monotonous stalemate of World War I, an influenza type A virus was traveling through the populations of the world at speeds far in excess of a soldier's march, although the virus would certainly hitch a ride with him when possible. The virus was generous in its visitation, effective in its infestation, and accurate in its aim . In the 1920s estimates suggested that the flu killed at least twenty-two million people within 10 months. More recent analyses indicate that this estimate of mortality is quite low because data from large parts of China and Africa, were not included . The combined battle deaths of American soldiers in World Wars 1 and 2, Korea, and Vietnam total

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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