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Trained Nurses in Family Magazines, 1880–1928

Trained Nurses in Family Magazines, 1880–1928 BRlCID LUSK Norrhern Illinois University Priscilla Sargent, fictional heroine of The Romance of the Trained Nurse, publ ished in 1893, had a ''p lain, strong face" and was "homely both in looks and ways." She decided she was not clever enough robe a reacher, or a writer, or a painter. "Yes," she thought, " I was made for a nurse. f am sorry for sick people and know I could take care of them ... (Figu re l). Trained nurs ing was a new occupation for women when Karie Upson Clark's story ofPriscilla's romance was published in Godey's Magazine. The days of"Sairy Gamps," of male and female convalesce nts nursing other patients, of well-meaning yet untrained religious sisters, were coming ro a dose. Following improvements in medical science and wirh impl ememarion of progressive-era welfare initiatives, trained nursing responded to a societal need. This paper traces the representation of nursing in family magazines from 1880 w 1928. The first nursing schools in the United $rates had opened in 1873, and in 1928 rhe la ndmark first report of the Comm itcee on th e Grading of Nursing Schools/ describing the current status of the profession, was published. Du ring http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Trained Nurses in Family Magazines, 1880–1928

Nursing History Review , Volume 10 (1): 17 – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.10.1.109
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BRlCID LUSK Norrhern Illinois University Priscilla Sargent, fictional heroine of The Romance of the Trained Nurse, publ ished in 1893, had a ''p lain, strong face" and was "homely both in looks and ways." She decided she was not clever enough robe a reacher, or a writer, or a painter. "Yes," she thought, " I was made for a nurse. f am sorry for sick people and know I could take care of them ... (Figu re l). Trained nurs ing was a new occupation for women when Karie Upson Clark's story ofPriscilla's romance was published in Godey's Magazine. The days of"Sairy Gamps," of male and female convalesce nts nursing other patients, of well-meaning yet untrained religious sisters, were coming ro a dose. Following improvements in medical science and wirh impl ememarion of progressive-era welfare initiatives, trained nursing responded to a societal need. This paper traces the representation of nursing in family magazines from 1880 w 1928. The first nursing schools in the United $rates had opened in 1873, and in 1928 rhe la ndmark first report of the Comm itcee on th e Grading of Nursing Schools/ describing the current status of the profession, was published. Du ring

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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