Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

“Trained Brains are Better Than Trained Muscles”: Scientific Management and Canadian Nurses, 1910–1939

“Trained Brains are Better Than Trained Muscles”: Scientific Management and Canadian Nurses,... "Trained Brains Are Better Than Trained Muscles": Scientific Management and Canadian Nurses, 1910-1939 CYNTHIA TOMA~ Vniversiry of Onawa Sciemific Managemem (SM), as originally conceived by Frederick Taylor and elabo­ rated by Frank and Lillian G ilbrem, may seem incongruent with perceptions of early North American hospitals as benevolent charities. Examination of changes occurring within both industry and hospitals at me beginning of me twentieth century, however, reveals interesting parallels related tO the rise of science, increased technology, increased production, professionalizarion of workers, and need for a large but cheap labor force. How did Sciemific Management as an industrial management strategy fit into an emerging social institution identified with caring, altruism, and human service? A preliminary examination of the literature gives the impression that hea lth care practitioners and institutions welcomed and adopted SM-that there was a relatively good fit between efficiency concepts and medical practice. Shifting the focus ro frondine bedside nurses. however, reveals a different exper ience. This paper examines SM as an example of "Failed rechnology" through the study of Canadian hospital settin gs, nursing literatu re , and nursi ng practice between 1910 and 1939. The profession experienced substantial changes in employmem rela­ tionsh ips and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

“Trained Brains are Better Than Trained Muscles”: Scientific Management and Canadian Nurses, 1910–1939

Nursing History Review , Volume 11 (1): 20 – Jan 1, 2003

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/trained-brains-are-better-than-trained-muscles-scientific-management-1xXk6W91VS
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.11.1.89
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

"Trained Brains Are Better Than Trained Muscles": Scientific Management and Canadian Nurses, 1910-1939 CYNTHIA TOMA~ Vniversiry of Onawa Sciemific Managemem (SM), as originally conceived by Frederick Taylor and elabo­ rated by Frank and Lillian G ilbrem, may seem incongruent with perceptions of early North American hospitals as benevolent charities. Examination of changes occurring within both industry and hospitals at me beginning of me twentieth century, however, reveals interesting parallels related tO the rise of science, increased technology, increased production, professionalizarion of workers, and need for a large but cheap labor force. How did Sciemific Management as an industrial management strategy fit into an emerging social institution identified with caring, altruism, and human service? A preliminary examination of the literature gives the impression that hea lth care practitioners and institutions welcomed and adopted SM-that there was a relatively good fit between efficiency concepts and medical practice. Shifting the focus ro frondine bedside nurses. however, reveals a different exper ience. This paper examines SM as an example of "Failed rechnology" through the study of Canadian hospital settin gs, nursing literatu re , and nursi ng practice between 1910 and 1939. The profession experienced substantial changes in employmem rela­ tionsh ips and

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.