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To Cultivate a Feeling of Confidence: The Nursing of Obstetric Patients, 1890–1940

To Cultivate a Feeling of Confidence: The Nursing of Obstetric Patients, 1890–1940 To Cultivate a Feeling of Confidence T he Nursing o f Obstetric Patients, 1890-194 0 SYLVIA RINKER Dep artmen t ofNursi ng Lynchbu rg College Mothers of infants bo rn at the e nd of the 19th century in America were the fi rst ro receive the assistance of the "trained obstetrical nurse. " Throughout the first half of the 20th centu ry the nurses who cared for obstetric patients were charged with managing patients, their fami lies, and their su r ro undings to make possible the aseptic delivery required by a growing medical science. Caring for new mothers who gave birth at home and later in hospitals , the pragmatic nurses of the first ha lf of th e 20th century were actively involved in developing an obstetric n ursing practice that espoused the traditional nursi ng values of caring and compassion but also bore clear mar ks of the growing medical and obstetric science of the time. In 1915, nurse Sara Bower stated emphatically that it was a particular responsibility of the nurse to "cultivate at a ll times a feeling of co n fidence in the patien t. " However, as historian Judith Leavitt argued, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

To Cultivate a Feeling of Confidence: The Nursing of Obstetric Patients, 1890–1940

Nursing History Review , Volume 8 (1): 26 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.8.1.117
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To Cultivate a Feeling of Confidence T he Nursing o f Obstetric Patients, 1890-194 0 SYLVIA RINKER Dep artmen t ofNursi ng Lynchbu rg College Mothers of infants bo rn at the e nd of the 19th century in America were the fi rst ro receive the assistance of the "trained obstetrical nurse. " Throughout the first half of the 20th centu ry the nurses who cared for obstetric patients were charged with managing patients, their fami lies, and their su r ro undings to make possible the aseptic delivery required by a growing medical science. Caring for new mothers who gave birth at home and later in hospitals , the pragmatic nurses of the first ha lf of th e 20th century were actively involved in developing an obstetric n ursing practice that espoused the traditional nursi ng values of caring and compassion but also bore clear mar ks of the growing medical and obstetric science of the time. In 1915, nurse Sara Bower stated emphatically that it was a particular responsibility of the nurse to "cultivate at a ll times a feeling of co n fidence in the patien t. " However, as historian Judith Leavitt argued,

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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