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To Care and Educate: The Continuity Within Queen’s Nursing in Scotland, c. 1948–2000

To Care and Educate: The Continuity Within Queen’s Nursing in Scotland, c. 1948–2000 To Care and Educate: The Continuity Within Queen’s Nursing in Scotland, c. 1948–2000 Janet Greenlees Glasgow Caledonian University Home nursing has been practiced in some form or another for many years, but in Britain it became formalized in 1889 through the Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI). Financed by a gift from Queen Victoria, the QNI provided the training and administration of home nurses and the home nursing ser - vice for many local, voluntary District Nurse Associations (DNAs). Although recruited by the QNI, local communities employed the nurse, providing her with a house, salary, and often transport. In return, the nurse was expected to live in the community, nurse the sick and dying, provide maternity services, and sometimes collect fees for services. The nurse reported to both the local committee and the QNI, with the latter ensuring the maintenance of high nursing standards. The Scottish branch of the Institute, the Queen’s Nursing Institute Scotland (QNIS), was formed in 1909, with a starting endowment of £400 from the overall income of the Queen’s gift to the institute of about £2,000. By the 1920s, most areas of Scotland had established DNAs, with the majority affiliated with the QNIS. Affiliation with the QNIS http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

To Care and Educate: The Continuity Within Queen’s Nursing in Scotland, c. 1948–2000

Nursing History Review , Volume 26 (1): 14 – Jan 1, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.26.1.97
Publisher site
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Abstract

To Care and Educate: The Continuity Within Queen’s Nursing in Scotland, c. 1948–2000 Janet Greenlees Glasgow Caledonian University Home nursing has been practiced in some form or another for many years, but in Britain it became formalized in 1889 through the Queen’s Nursing Institute (QNI). Financed by a gift from Queen Victoria, the QNI provided the training and administration of home nurses and the home nursing ser - vice for many local, voluntary District Nurse Associations (DNAs). Although recruited by the QNI, local communities employed the nurse, providing her with a house, salary, and often transport. In return, the nurse was expected to live in the community, nurse the sick and dying, provide maternity services, and sometimes collect fees for services. The nurse reported to both the local committee and the QNI, with the latter ensuring the maintenance of high nursing standards. The Scottish branch of the Institute, the Queen’s Nursing Institute Scotland (QNIS), was formed in 1909, with a starting endowment of £400 from the overall income of the Queen’s gift to the institute of about £2,000. By the 1920s, most areas of Scotland had established DNAs, with the majority affiliated with the QNIS. Affiliation with the QNIS

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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