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Those of Little Note: Enslaved Plantation “Sick Nurses”

Those of Little Note: Enslaved Plantation “Sick Nurses” Those of Little Note: Enslaved Plantation “Sick Nurses” Meredith Reifschneider San Francisco State University Introduction In May 1803, the Danish Crown abolished the traffic of enslaved people from Africa. Although the repercussions of this legislation were immense for interna- tional relationships among European nations, for plantation owners, and most importantly, for enslaved people, the ban on the slave trade precipitated drastic changes to the healthcare system in the Danish colonies. By 1822, the Danish Board of Health passed legislation that required all European physicians working in the Danish West Indies to submit yearly health reports to Copenhagen. These documents provided a record of raw, demographic data and narrative accounts of how physicians treated their patients on the islands. These reports also contained information the Danish Board of Health and Danish colonial administration deemed important for managing the health of African, African-descendent, and European people. Just as statistical data reveal the social and political contexts in which it developed, the Board of Health documents indicate the empirical strategies and political concerns of the Danish government. Although these reports contain an abundance of information, how enslaved people, particularly women, practiced medicine on the islands is absent from the Danish Board of Health http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Those of Little Note: Enslaved Plantation “Sick Nurses”

Nursing History Review , Volume 29 (1): 23 – Dec 24, 2020

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.29.179
Publisher site
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Abstract

Those of Little Note: Enslaved Plantation “Sick Nurses” Meredith Reifschneider San Francisco State University Introduction In May 1803, the Danish Crown abolished the traffic of enslaved people from Africa. Although the repercussions of this legislation were immense for interna- tional relationships among European nations, for plantation owners, and most importantly, for enslaved people, the ban on the slave trade precipitated drastic changes to the healthcare system in the Danish colonies. By 1822, the Danish Board of Health passed legislation that required all European physicians working in the Danish West Indies to submit yearly health reports to Copenhagen. These documents provided a record of raw, demographic data and narrative accounts of how physicians treated their patients on the islands. These reports also contained information the Danish Board of Health and Danish colonial administration deemed important for managing the health of African, African-descendent, and European people. Just as statistical data reveal the social and political contexts in which it developed, the Board of Health documents indicate the empirical strategies and political concerns of the Danish government. Although these reports contain an abundance of information, how enslaved people, particularly women, practiced medicine on the islands is absent from the Danish Board of Health

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 24, 2020

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