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Think Globally, Act Locally

Think Globally, Act Locally INTRODUCTION Toni P. Miles To respond to the challenges posed by an older health care workforce, Think Globally, Act Locally. If you are in a position to make staffing decisions for your hospital, then you are probably experiencing difficulty finding nurses, technicians, and pharmacists. If you are building training programs in the allied health field for your community, then you are very familiar with the scarcity of qualified teachers needed for these programs. If you are a public health official working to respond to the dual epidemics of AIDS and obesity- related diseases, then you are frustrated because you have fewer physicians, health educators, and public health workers than you need. In each of these scenarios, managers or department heads are faced with shortages of skilled workers. Each administrator probably thinks that more training programs will solve their individual problems. None of the administrators would iden- tify their local problem as a manifestation of the global aging epidemic. How is aging an epidemic? Any phenomenon that occurs at a rate that is over and above background levels can be thought of as an epidemic. Steve Mur- dock (chapter 2) summarizes trends in the population in the following ways: Minority http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Think Globally, Act Locally

Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics , Volume 25 (1): NaN – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.25.1.xix
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTION Toni P. Miles To respond to the challenges posed by an older health care workforce, Think Globally, Act Locally. If you are in a position to make staffing decisions for your hospital, then you are probably experiencing difficulty finding nurses, technicians, and pharmacists. If you are building training programs in the allied health field for your community, then you are very familiar with the scarcity of qualified teachers needed for these programs. If you are a public health official working to respond to the dual epidemics of AIDS and obesity- related diseases, then you are frustrated because you have fewer physicians, health educators, and public health workers than you need. In each of these scenarios, managers or department heads are faced with shortages of skilled workers. Each administrator probably thinks that more training programs will solve their individual problems. None of the administrators would iden- tify their local problem as a manifestation of the global aging epidemic. How is aging an epidemic? Any phenomenon that occurs at a rate that is over and above background levels can be thought of as an epidemic. Steve Mur- dock (chapter 2) summarizes trends in the population in the following ways: Minority

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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