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The Wind of Change is Blowing

The Wind of Change is Blowing SusAN McGANN Royal College of Nursing of the Un ited Kingdom In 1945 Anna Schwarzenberg, executive secretary of the International Council of Nurses, vis ired the various coumries ofEurope to assess rhe problems of the n ursing profession following rhe war. Of her visit to England, she wrote, "Nursing has made great strides during t he years of rhe war. A younger, more alen group is coming to the fore ... . If the older nurses could realize that me t imes are so changed that they require the farsigh ted, vigorous oudook roward the future rhar only younger peop le can have, and if they, the older generation, could generously step aside and enjoy a well-earned retreat, nurs ing could go fo rward unhampered and in the right direction. " ln the afrerma[h of che Second World War, great social chan ges swept t hrough society. Schwanenberg was expressing the hope of many nurses in Britain British at that rime that rhe long tradition of animosity between the two main p rofessional n ursing organ izations in Br itain , the National Counci l of Nurses and the Royal College of Nursing, could be pu t behind them http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Nursing History Review , Volume 10 (1): 12 – Jan 1, 2002

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.10.1.21
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

SusAN McGANN Royal College of Nursing of the Un ited Kingdom In 1945 Anna Schwarzenberg, executive secretary of the International Council of Nurses, vis ired the various coumries ofEurope to assess rhe problems of the n ursing profession following rhe war. Of her visit to England, she wrote, "Nursing has made great strides during t he years of rhe war. A younger, more alen group is coming to the fore ... . If the older nurses could realize that me t imes are so changed that they require the farsigh ted, vigorous oudook roward the future rhar only younger peop le can have, and if they, the older generation, could generously step aside and enjoy a well-earned retreat, nurs ing could go fo rward unhampered and in the right direction. " ln the afrerma[h of che Second World War, great social chan ges swept t hrough society. Schwanenberg was expressing the hope of many nurses in Britain British at that rime that rhe long tradition of animosity between the two main p rofessional n ursing organ izations in Br itain , the National Counci l of Nurses and the Royal College of Nursing, could be pu t behind them

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2002

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