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The Ultimate Destination of All Nursing: The Development of District Nursing in England, 1880–1925

The Ultimate Destination of All Nursing: The Development of District Nursing in England, 1880–1925 P1: OSO/OVY P2: OSO/OVY QC: OSO/OVY T1: OSO SVNF004-06 SVNF004-v4 August 24, 2006 9:5 “The Ultimate Destination of All Nursing”: The Development of District Nursing in England, 1880–1925 Carrie Howse University of Gloucestershire Florence Nightingale is chiefly remembered for the reform of hospital nursing in the late nineteenth century, but scant attention has been paid to her involvement in the establishment and development of district nursing throughout England. Nightingale believed that the future of nursing lay in district nursing, with its dual aims of curative care and preventive education, yet historians of British nursing tend to concentrate on general nursing in the hospital setting because that is where training occurred. District nursing, if it is mentioned at all in such studies, is seen as only a footnote to the broader context of social history and philanthropy. The only official histories of district nursing were written by Mary Stocks and Monica Baly in 1960 and 1987, respectively, and these two slim volumes remain the main sources on Queen Victoria’s Jubilee Institute for Nurses (QVJI), the central body that standardized training and unified existing philanthropic schemes through its system of affiliation and inspection. Baly uses Stocks as her main secondary source, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Ultimate Destination of All Nursing: The Development of District Nursing in England, 1880–1925

Nursing History Review , Volume 15 (1): 30 – Sep 1, 2007

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.15.65
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

P1: OSO/OVY P2: OSO/OVY QC: OSO/OVY T1: OSO SVNF004-06 SVNF004-v4 August 24, 2006 9:5 “The Ultimate Destination of All Nursing”: The Development of District Nursing in England, 1880–1925 Carrie Howse University of Gloucestershire Florence Nightingale is chiefly remembered for the reform of hospital nursing in the late nineteenth century, but scant attention has been paid to her involvement in the establishment and development of district nursing throughout England. Nightingale believed that the future of nursing lay in district nursing, with its dual aims of curative care and preventive education, yet historians of British nursing tend to concentrate on general nursing in the hospital setting because that is where training occurred. District nursing, if it is mentioned at all in such studies, is seen as only a footnote to the broader context of social history and philanthropy. The only official histories of district nursing were written by Mary Stocks and Monica Baly in 1960 and 1987, respectively, and these two slim volumes remain the main sources on Queen Victoria’s Jubilee Institute for Nurses (QVJI), the central body that standardized training and unified existing philanthropic schemes through its system of affiliation and inspection. Baly uses Stocks as her main secondary source,

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2007

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