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The Third Reich in the Pages of the American Journal of Nursing, 1932–1950

The Third Reich in the Pages of the American Journal of Nursing, 1932–1950 The Third Reich in the Pages of the American Journal of Nursing , 1932–1950 MARY D. LAGERWEY Western Michigan University Until the early 1990s, there had been little research in the United States on nurs- ing’s involvement in the Third Reich and the Holocaust. German historian Hilde Steppe’s work, for example, was first published in the United States in 1992. Re- cent studies have yielded stories of complicity and murder juxtaposed with stories of heroism, resistance, and courage. In order for nursing to better understand its evolving identity in society, it is essential that nursing incorporate these complex and often disturbing findings into its collective memory, as a part of its “source of identity, [its] cultural DNA.” It is not clear whether nursing has forgotten or simply never addressed the relevancy of the Third Reich for the profession. We know that the United States as a whole responded inadequately to European Jews’ needs for asylum; the nurs- ing profession must also ask itself whether it could have intervened on behalf of Jewish nurses in Europe and other victims of the Holocaust or in response to criminal behavior of nurses under the Third Reich. As Deborah Lipstadt showed in her http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Third Reich in the Pages of the American Journal of Nursing, 1932–1950

Nursing History Review , Volume 14 (1): 29 – Sep 1, 2006

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.14.59
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Third Reich in the Pages of the American Journal of Nursing , 1932–1950 MARY D. LAGERWEY Western Michigan University Until the early 1990s, there had been little research in the United States on nurs- ing’s involvement in the Third Reich and the Holocaust. German historian Hilde Steppe’s work, for example, was first published in the United States in 1992. Re- cent studies have yielded stories of complicity and murder juxtaposed with stories of heroism, resistance, and courage. In order for nursing to better understand its evolving identity in society, it is essential that nursing incorporate these complex and often disturbing findings into its collective memory, as a part of its “source of identity, [its] cultural DNA.” It is not clear whether nursing has forgotten or simply never addressed the relevancy of the Third Reich for the profession. We know that the United States as a whole responded inadequately to European Jews’ needs for asylum; the nurs- ing profession must also ask itself whether it could have intervened on behalf of Jewish nurses in Europe and other victims of the Holocaust or in response to criminal behavior of nurses under the Third Reich. As Deborah Lipstadt showed in her

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2006

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