Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Rise and Demise of the Colonial Nursing Service: British Nurses in the Colonies, 1896–1966

The Rise and Demise of the Colonial Nursing Service: British Nurses in the Colonies, 1896–1966 P1: OSO/OVY P2: OSO/OVY QC: OSO/OVY T1: OSO SVNF004-09 SVNF004-v4 August 24, 2006 9:7 RESEARCH REPORTS The Rise and Demise of the Colonial Nursing Service: British Nurses in the Colonies, 1896–1966 Anne Marie Rafferty King’s College London Diana Solano King’s College London For a period of seventy years, from 1896 to 1966, the Colonial Nursing As- sociation (CNA) (renamed the Overseas Nursing Association [ONA] in 1919) recruited 8,400 women to work as nurses throughout the British Empire. The Association operated as a recruitment agency for the Colonial Office (CO), and during its operation, recruits were sent to every dominion and territory of the Em- pire. Initially, the CO adopted an arm’s-length approach, but during World War II it became more directly involved in overseas nurse recruitment, establishing the Colonial Nursing Service (CNS) in 1940. The CNS formalized the govern- ment’s policies in relation to nurse colonial officers who were recruited through the ONA. This development ensured parity for women in the colonial service, promoting mobility across colonies and creating the conditions for international reciprocity in nurse education and training. In effect, it established a British nursing “empire,” with nursing sisters leading education and training as well as implementing nursing http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Rise and Demise of the Colonial Nursing Service: British Nurses in the Colonies, 1896–1966

Nursing History Review , Volume 15 (1): 8 – Sep 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/the-rise-and-demise-of-the-colonial-nursing-service-british-nurses-in-w0YiJc0Mcm
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.15.147
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

P1: OSO/OVY P2: OSO/OVY QC: OSO/OVY T1: OSO SVNF004-09 SVNF004-v4 August 24, 2006 9:7 RESEARCH REPORTS The Rise and Demise of the Colonial Nursing Service: British Nurses in the Colonies, 1896–1966 Anne Marie Rafferty King’s College London Diana Solano King’s College London For a period of seventy years, from 1896 to 1966, the Colonial Nursing As- sociation (CNA) (renamed the Overseas Nursing Association [ONA] in 1919) recruited 8,400 women to work as nurses throughout the British Empire. The Association operated as a recruitment agency for the Colonial Office (CO), and during its operation, recruits were sent to every dominion and territory of the Em- pire. Initially, the CO adopted an arm’s-length approach, but during World War II it became more directly involved in overseas nurse recruitment, establishing the Colonial Nursing Service (CNS) in 1940. The CNS formalized the govern- ment’s policies in relation to nurse colonial officers who were recruited through the ONA. This development ensured parity for women in the colonial service, promoting mobility across colonies and creating the conditions for international reciprocity in nurse education and training. In effect, it established a British nursing “empire,” with nursing sisters leading education and training as well as implementing nursing

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2007

There are no references for this article.