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The Place of Religion as an Interpretive Tool in Nursing History

The Place of Religion as an Interpretive Tool in Nursing History THE PLACE OF RELIGION AS AN INTERPRETIVE TOOL IN NURSING HISTORY Guest Editor’s Note Often historiography keeps religion at arm’s length. In writing about the place of religion within history, David Gary Shaw discusses the challenges this brings, including rearranging “our conceptualizations of the religious and the secular, of our own vision, and the paradigms that organize our knowledge, so that we can see our way to a more productive and less anxious relationship between secular eyes and religious topics.” As important are the ways we write about people whose beliefs diff er from ours. Indeed, historians may need to revise their methods “if they are to cope productively with believers past and present, even if we can disregard what historians themselves believe.” In this issue, we feature two essays that open paths for historians of nurs- ing to rethink the relationship between religion and nursing history. One is a local study by Anne Z. Cockerham and Arlene W. Keeling, who examine the Catholic Medical Mission Sisters as nurse-midwives in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Th ey are interested in the relationship between the sisters’ religious practices and beliefs and the economics involved in their work with Spanish American clients. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Place of Religion as an Interpretive Tool in Nursing History

Nursing History Review , Volume 18 (1): 4 – Jan 1, 2010

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.18.130
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE PLACE OF RELIGION AS AN INTERPRETIVE TOOL IN NURSING HISTORY Guest Editor’s Note Often historiography keeps religion at arm’s length. In writing about the place of religion within history, David Gary Shaw discusses the challenges this brings, including rearranging “our conceptualizations of the religious and the secular, of our own vision, and the paradigms that organize our knowledge, so that we can see our way to a more productive and less anxious relationship between secular eyes and religious topics.” As important are the ways we write about people whose beliefs diff er from ours. Indeed, historians may need to revise their methods “if they are to cope productively with believers past and present, even if we can disregard what historians themselves believe.” In this issue, we feature two essays that open paths for historians of nurs- ing to rethink the relationship between religion and nursing history. One is a local study by Anne Z. Cockerham and Arlene W. Keeling, who examine the Catholic Medical Mission Sisters as nurse-midwives in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Th ey are interested in the relationship between the sisters’ religious practices and beliefs and the economics involved in their work with Spanish American clients.

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2010

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