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The Physician’s: Eyes American Nursing and the Diagnostic Revolution in Medicine

The Physician’s: Eyes American Nursing and the Diagnostic Revolution in Medicine ARTICLES The Physician's Eyes American Nursing and the Diagnostic Revolution in Medicine MARGARETE SANDELOWSKI Department of Women's and Children's Health University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill {The) Nurse Should Be the Doctor's Eyes in His Absence The emergence of trained nursing in the United States in the 1870s and its capture in hospitals by the 1930s did not merely coincide with the diagnostic revolution that fundamentally transformed American medicine in this period; they were tightly linked. During this time, hospitals were increasingly sold to potential patients as sites for the sympathetic and scientific care embodied in rhe new trained nurse and the new diagnostic technology housed there. Although barely (if at all) mentioned in histories of medical technology and hospitals, nurses were more than footnotes in the story of how technologically mediated diagnosis became a distinguishing feature of medical practice and hospital care. Nurses played a crucial role in this transformation, sharing with physicians the use of such new devices as the thermometer and often perform­ ing much of the physical, mental, and "sentimental" labor engendered by x-ray and laboratory tests. Nurses made hospitals more hospitable, not only to patients but also to the new devices and device-mediated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Physician’s: Eyes American Nursing and the Diagnostic Revolution in Medicine

Nursing History Review , Volume 8 (1): 36 – Jan 1, 2000

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.8.1.3
Publisher site
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Abstract

ARTICLES The Physician's Eyes American Nursing and the Diagnostic Revolution in Medicine MARGARETE SANDELOWSKI Department of Women's and Children's Health University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill {The) Nurse Should Be the Doctor's Eyes in His Absence The emergence of trained nursing in the United States in the 1870s and its capture in hospitals by the 1930s did not merely coincide with the diagnostic revolution that fundamentally transformed American medicine in this period; they were tightly linked. During this time, hospitals were increasingly sold to potential patients as sites for the sympathetic and scientific care embodied in rhe new trained nurse and the new diagnostic technology housed there. Although barely (if at all) mentioned in histories of medical technology and hospitals, nurses were more than footnotes in the story of how technologically mediated diagnosis became a distinguishing feature of medical practice and hospital care. Nurses played a crucial role in this transformation, sharing with physicians the use of such new devices as the thermometer and often perform­ ing much of the physical, mental, and "sentimental" labor engendered by x-ray and laboratory tests. Nurses made hospitals more hospitable, not only to patients but also to the new devices and device-mediated

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2000

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