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The Nursing of the All Saints Sisters

The Nursing of the All Saints Sisters HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT Carol Helmstadter University of Toronto Introduction A century after her death, Florence Nightingale continues to cast a long shadow over the history of nursing, especially in the English-speaking world where her work in the Crimean War and her training school at St Thomas’s long served to demonstrate the distinct body of knowledge and unitary sphere of prac- tice that justified nursing’s professional claims. More recently, with a longer perspective, historians have increasingly turned their attention to the wider context of nineteenth century social, economic, and political culture within which the new nursing developed. These historians emphasized the diversity of nursing practitioners and the unhappy contingencies in nursing history. In these newer studies no pioneers of modern nursing have been more “hidden in plain sight” than the Anglican sisterhood, the All Saints Sisters of the Poor, who were leaders in early nursing reform in England. In 1848, twelve years before the Nightingale School opened at St Thomas’s Hospital, another Angli- can sisterhood, St John’s House, established the first training school for nurses; in 1856 they took over the whole of the nursing at King’s College Hospital, one of the twelve London teaching hospitals. Traditionally, matrons reported to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Nursing of the All Saints Sisters

Nursing History Review , Volume 29 (1): 21 – Dec 24, 2020

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.29.142
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT Carol Helmstadter University of Toronto Introduction A century after her death, Florence Nightingale continues to cast a long shadow over the history of nursing, especially in the English-speaking world where her work in the Crimean War and her training school at St Thomas’s long served to demonstrate the distinct body of knowledge and unitary sphere of prac- tice that justified nursing’s professional claims. More recently, with a longer perspective, historians have increasingly turned their attention to the wider context of nineteenth century social, economic, and political culture within which the new nursing developed. These historians emphasized the diversity of nursing practitioners and the unhappy contingencies in nursing history. In these newer studies no pioneers of modern nursing have been more “hidden in plain sight” than the Anglican sisterhood, the All Saints Sisters of the Poor, who were leaders in early nursing reform in England. In 1848, twelve years before the Nightingale School opened at St Thomas’s Hospital, another Angli- can sisterhood, St John’s House, established the first training school for nurses; in 1856 they took over the whole of the nursing at King’s College Hospital, one of the twelve London teaching hospitals. Traditionally, matrons reported to

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 24, 2020

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