Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

The Nurses of Ellis Island: Caring for the Huddled Masses

The Nurses of Ellis Island: Caring for the Huddled Masses The Nurses of Ellis Island: Caring for the Huddled Masses Michelle C. Hehman The University of Virginia “Every hospital is, of course, a scene of pathos and tragedy, but Ellis Island Hospital had problems peculiarly its own. It was especially hard to witness the separation of families when perhaps the hopes of a lifetime were shattered.” Introduction Margaret V. Daly, chief nurse on Ellis Island, admitted how difficult it had been to watch as some of her patients were denied entrance into the United States. But in the same reflection, she also noted that she felt “convinced that nursing the sick immigrant was a most commendable and charitable under- taking.” During her thirty plus years in the Public Health Service (PHS), Daly spent nearly all of that time caring for patients at the Ellis Island Gen- eral Hospital. She witnessed the full range of human experiences—births and deaths, joy and pain, extreme suffering, and hard-fought triumph. Knowing the reality of what was at stake for her patients heightened Daly’s sensation to their situation; the fate of the immigrants on Ellis Island hung in the balance between entry and deportation, with the medical examination often the final obstacle in determining http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Nurses of Ellis Island: Caring for the Huddled Masses

Nursing History Review , Volume 29 (1): 28 – Dec 24, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/the-nurses-of-ellis-island-caring-for-the-huddled-masses-fWm5UYiLXO
Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.29.50
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Nurses of Ellis Island: Caring for the Huddled Masses Michelle C. Hehman The University of Virginia “Every hospital is, of course, a scene of pathos and tragedy, but Ellis Island Hospital had problems peculiarly its own. It was especially hard to witness the separation of families when perhaps the hopes of a lifetime were shattered.” Introduction Margaret V. Daly, chief nurse on Ellis Island, admitted how difficult it had been to watch as some of her patients were denied entrance into the United States. But in the same reflection, she also noted that she felt “convinced that nursing the sick immigrant was a most commendable and charitable under- taking.” During her thirty plus years in the Public Health Service (PHS), Daly spent nearly all of that time caring for patients at the Ellis Island Gen- eral Hospital. She witnessed the full range of human experiences—births and deaths, joy and pain, extreme suffering, and hard-fought triumph. Knowing the reality of what was at stake for her patients heightened Daly’s sensation to their situation; the fate of the immigrants on Ellis Island hung in the balance between entry and deportation, with the medical examination often the final obstacle in determining

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 24, 2020

There are no references for this article.