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The Nightingale Model of Nursing

The Nightingale Model of Nursing Book Reviews By Rob van der Peet (Edinburg: Champion Press, 1995) The author intends this book to be an in-depth analysis of Nightingale's model of nursing (as defined by present-day scholars) 'rather than by areconstruction of the chronology of the historical events which mde up her life" (p. 8). Rob van der Peet argues that Nightingale should not be considered the "founder of modern nursing" because her model's religious presuppositions and sanitary implications make it too idiosyncratic to have influenced nursing. He con- cedes, however, that she might be accorded the founder title for other reasons. The author relies on sources from both sides of the Atlantic to describe Nightingale's life and her concepts of nursing and nursing education. His discussion of her concepts and model of nursing occupies slightly over half of the book. The remainder is a photographic reproduction of Notes on Nursing published by Harrison, in 1876, in London, It is quite helpful to have one of his original sources included with his discourse. He also utilizes the Training ofNurses, Narsing thc Sick, and Sick Nursing and Hedlth Nursing for his analysis of Nightingale's concept of nursing and her Ssrggestiomfor Thought for his analysis on her http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Nightingale Model of Nursing

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.161
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews By Rob van der Peet (Edinburg: Champion Press, 1995) The author intends this book to be an in-depth analysis of Nightingale's model of nursing (as defined by present-day scholars) 'rather than by areconstruction of the chronology of the historical events which mde up her life" (p. 8). Rob van der Peet argues that Nightingale should not be considered the "founder of modern nursing" because her model's religious presuppositions and sanitary implications make it too idiosyncratic to have influenced nursing. He con- cedes, however, that she might be accorded the founder title for other reasons. The author relies on sources from both sides of the Atlantic to describe Nightingale's life and her concepts of nursing and nursing education. His discussion of her concepts and model of nursing occupies slightly over half of the book. The remainder is a photographic reproduction of Notes on Nursing published by Harrison, in 1876, in London, It is quite helpful to have one of his original sources included with his discourse. He also utilizes the Training ofNurses, Narsing thc Sick, and Sick Nursing and Hedlth Nursing for his analysis of Nightingale's concept of nursing and her Ssrggestiomfor Thought for his analysis on her

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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