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The Historical Relationship of Nursing Program Accreditation and Public Policy in Canada

The Historical Relationship of Nursing Program Accreditation and Public Policy in Canada The Historical Relationship of Nursing Program Accreditation and Public Policy in Canada SHARON L. RICHARDSON Fadty of Nursing University of Alberta In North America, adtation of nursing education programs has been promoted as a mechanism for ensuring that predetermined stamlards arc met. The National League for Nursmg (NLN) is the ad* agency in the United States, and the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing (CAUSN) sponsors a voluntary accreditation program for univer- sity schools of nursing in Canada. Acceptance of accreditation has been gream in the United States than in Canada. Unlike rhe situation in the United States, only one-third of Canada's 33 badureare programs are currently accredited, and there is no accreditation available for the 122 diploma programs that continue ro prepare three-quarters of all Canadian nurses to mter practice, or for the 13 graduak programs that prepare ad- vanced practitioners, teachers, and adminismtors. In comparison, in the United Stam a significant majoriry of diploma, associate degree, bacm- laureate, and m&s programs are accredited by the NL;N. The purpose of my research was to analyze. rhe history of nursing education program accreditation in Canada within the cantext of public policy and to contrast it with the history http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Historical Relationship of Nursing Program Accreditation and Public Policy in Canada

Nursing History Review , Volume 4 (1): 23 – Jan 1, 1996

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.4.1.19
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Historical Relationship of Nursing Program Accreditation and Public Policy in Canada SHARON L. RICHARDSON Fadty of Nursing University of Alberta In North America, adtation of nursing education programs has been promoted as a mechanism for ensuring that predetermined stamlards arc met. The National League for Nursmg (NLN) is the ad* agency in the United States, and the Canadian Association of University Schools of Nursing (CAUSN) sponsors a voluntary accreditation program for univer- sity schools of nursing in Canada. Acceptance of accreditation has been gream in the United States than in Canada. Unlike rhe situation in the United States, only one-third of Canada's 33 badureare programs are currently accredited, and there is no accreditation available for the 122 diploma programs that continue ro prepare three-quarters of all Canadian nurses to mter practice, or for the 13 graduak programs that prepare ad- vanced practitioners, teachers, and adminismtors. In comparison, in the United Stam a significant majoriry of diploma, associate degree, bacm- laureate, and m&s programs are accredited by the NL;N. The purpose of my research was to analyze. rhe history of nursing education program accreditation in Canada within the cantext of public policy and to contrast it with the history

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1996

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