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The Historian and the Activist: How to Tell Stories that Matter

The Historian and the Activist: How to Tell Stories that Matter The Historian and the Activist: How to Tell Stories that Matter Wendy Kline Purdue University “A reminder of what to worry about,” Susan Reverby wrote on her Facebook page on New Year’s day, 2018, returning home to discover that severe weather left her without Internet, phone, or cable. “Call Comcast: guy is coming. Get to the office and discover left half the computer plug at the Cape. Get in the car, drive to Apple Store, buy replacement plug, go back to the office. All anno ying, all fixable.” These are life’s distractions, often keeping us from writing, doing, or seeing what we need to. “The other things:” she continued, “commitment to more resistance, fight for solidarity worldwide, more work, not so easy a fix, but the real things to worry about.” Wise words from a woman who has spent her career committed to resistance and solidarity. Since the beginning of her career, Reverby has sought to balance these challenges—the mundane yet fixable tasks—along with those too overwhelm - ing to always confront. In the early 1970s, Reverby, who self-identified as a “leftist feminist critic of the healthcare system” channeled her activism through the Health Policy Advisory Center in New http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Historian and the Activist: How to Tell Stories that Matter

Nursing History Review , Volume 27 (1): 5 – Jan 1, 2019

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.27.99
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Historian and the Activist: How to Tell Stories that Matter Wendy Kline Purdue University “A reminder of what to worry about,” Susan Reverby wrote on her Facebook page on New Year’s day, 2018, returning home to discover that severe weather left her without Internet, phone, or cable. “Call Comcast: guy is coming. Get to the office and discover left half the computer plug at the Cape. Get in the car, drive to Apple Store, buy replacement plug, go back to the office. All anno ying, all fixable.” These are life’s distractions, often keeping us from writing, doing, or seeing what we need to. “The other things:” she continued, “commitment to more resistance, fight for solidarity worldwide, more work, not so easy a fix, but the real things to worry about.” Wise words from a woman who has spent her career committed to resistance and solidarity. Since the beginning of her career, Reverby has sought to balance these challenges—the mundane yet fixable tasks—along with those too overwhelm - ing to always confront. In the early 1970s, Reverby, who self-identified as a “leftist feminist critic of the healthcare system” channeled her activism through the Health Policy Advisory Center in New

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2019

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