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The Eternally Wounded Woman: Women, Doctors and Exercise in the Late Nineteenth Century

The Eternally Wounded Woman: Women, Doctors and Exercise in the Late Nineteenth Century Ironically, it is the RCN, whose leaders COHSE members caricatured as "sherry sipping, middle-class women . . . complete with Mrin [sweater) set and pearls" (p. f OS), which emerges as the more skillful tactician and organizer in the struggle. Hart suggescs that its image as an organization *for nurses only" made it easier for the RCN to accommodate the new order. COHSE, on the other hand, had not only ta consider irs registered nurse members but its enrolled nurse and ancillary health care membership as well: Unfortunately, what benefited one group was often disadvantageous to the others. The RCN's reward for its flexibility was a much expanded membership. COHSE's accompanying decline in its nursing ranks had much to do, Hart argues, with the organization's 1996 decision to join forces with two large trade unions. As noted, Hart is a regional officer of UNISON and one might expect him to have access to COHSE's records and use them in his study. Unfortunately, his work is based primarily on secondary literature, and the major original sources are articles from RCN and COHSE newspapers. Without primary sources, Hart cannoc and does not offer a complete history of nurses' trade unions and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Eternally Wounded Woman: Women, Doctors and Exercise in the Late Nineteenth Century

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.165
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ironically, it is the RCN, whose leaders COHSE members caricatured as "sherry sipping, middle-class women . . . complete with Mrin [sweater) set and pearls" (p. f OS), which emerges as the more skillful tactician and organizer in the struggle. Hart suggescs that its image as an organization *for nurses only" made it easier for the RCN to accommodate the new order. COHSE, on the other hand, had not only ta consider irs registered nurse members but its enrolled nurse and ancillary health care membership as well: Unfortunately, what benefited one group was often disadvantageous to the others. The RCN's reward for its flexibility was a much expanded membership. COHSE's accompanying decline in its nursing ranks had much to do, Hart argues, with the organization's 1996 decision to join forces with two large trade unions. As noted, Hart is a regional officer of UNISON and one might expect him to have access to COHSE's records and use them in his study. Unfortunately, his work is based primarily on secondary literature, and the major original sources are articles from RCN and COHSE newspapers. Without primary sources, Hart cannoc and does not offer a complete history of nurses' trade unions and

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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