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The Eclipse of the State Mental Hospital: Policy, Stigma, and Organization

The Eclipse of the State Mental Hospital: Policy, Stigma, and Organization women were willing to undergo the necessary treatments. During the last half of the 20th century, however, &tts have bccn directed at assisting both men and women to ov&me reproduetion barriers through pharwLgii and in vitro fertdlzatioa procedures. A conshat &me that recurs in TheEmpg Cradk is that clinicians rarely wait for the verdict of Ehc laboratory before offering possible solutions to their patients. Part of cbe tragedy of infertility is the dashing of hopes raised by the untested promises of science and technology. The authors document medid discoveries and therapia in a dear, saaightfbrward style. They also effectively communiae the human story behind the scientific one ho+ the poignant comments of rhe women who have suffered infertilitv and its assodated indiities from coloniat clays to the presenr. In the process of tracing this history, Mad and Ronner debunk two persistent myths surrounding infertility. The publicity surrounding inueas- in& complex techniques used to *assistw reproduction leads to the erroneous impression that ram of infertiliw are on the rise. Marsh and Ronner demon- stkte that those rates have not &wed substantkllv since the mid-nineteenth century, when rbe rate of involuat& cbildessaess kg& from about eight to burteen percent of the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Eclipse of the State Mental Hospital: Policy, Stigma, and Organization

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.148
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

women were willing to undergo the necessary treatments. During the last half of the 20th century, however, &tts have bccn directed at assisting both men and women to ov&me reproduetion barriers through pharwLgii and in vitro fertdlzatioa procedures. A conshat &me that recurs in TheEmpg Cradk is that clinicians rarely wait for the verdict of Ehc laboratory before offering possible solutions to their patients. Part of cbe tragedy of infertility is the dashing of hopes raised by the untested promises of science and technology. The authors document medid discoveries and therapia in a dear, saaightfbrward style. They also effectively communiae the human story behind the scientific one ho+ the poignant comments of rhe women who have suffered infertilitv and its assodated indiities from coloniat clays to the presenr. In the process of tracing this history, Mad and Ronner debunk two persistent myths surrounding infertility. The publicity surrounding inueas- in& complex techniques used to *assistw reproduction leads to the erroneous impression that ram of infertiliw are on the rise. Marsh and Ronner demon- stkte that those rates have not &wed substantkllv since the mid-nineteenth century, when rbe rate of involuat& cbildessaess kg& from about eight to burteen percent of the

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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