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The Diary of Emily Jane Green Hollister: Her Nursing Experiences, 1888–1911

The Diary of Emily Jane Green Hollister: Her Nursing Experiences, 1888–1911 Book Reviews zq9 of the Poor," providing them with supportive services and, when necessary, encouraging them to seek help in institutions. Bates illuminates the present by re&ctbg on the past and also gives meaning to the past on its own terms. She makm dear the particular codgurations of social welfare, medid dens and human need in the late nineteenth and early twentieth cenruries that shaped the responses to tuberculosis. At the same time, without &wing explicit comparisons, she tempts readers to consider the parallels between mberdosis and AIDS. There are many; fear and stigmatization of the sick, then and now, is the most obvious parallel. Anoher is the ways in which individuals are per- suaded m risk heir lives m a-eat the af€licted. For some the lure is a life on the cutting edge of scienrific research; for others it is rhe simple opportunity to do good; and, for a few, both are me. In sum, disease is about bargains. And while the particulars of any illness must be understmd in historid context, its mnsmndmt feam must also lx explored. Barn has offered us the opportunity to do so, and her book, I am certain, will fiad a broad http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Diary of Emily Jane Green Hollister: Her Nursing Experiences, 1888–1911

Nursing History Review , Volume 1 (1): 2 – Jan 1, 1993

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.1.1.249
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews zq9 of the Poor," providing them with supportive services and, when necessary, encouraging them to seek help in institutions. Bates illuminates the present by re&ctbg on the past and also gives meaning to the past on its own terms. She makm dear the particular codgurations of social welfare, medid dens and human need in the late nineteenth and early twentieth cenruries that shaped the responses to tuberculosis. At the same time, without &wing explicit comparisons, she tempts readers to consider the parallels between mberdosis and AIDS. There are many; fear and stigmatization of the sick, then and now, is the most obvious parallel. Anoher is the ways in which individuals are per- suaded m risk heir lives m a-eat the af€licted. For some the lure is a life on the cutting edge of scienrific research; for others it is rhe simple opportunity to do good; and, for a few, both are me. In sum, disease is about bargains. And while the particulars of any illness must be understmd in historid context, its mnsmndmt feam must also lx explored. Barn has offered us the opportunity to do so, and her book, I am certain, will fiad a broad

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1993

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