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The Business of Private Medical Practice: Doctors, Specialization, and Urban Change in Philadelphia, 1900–1940

The Business of Private Medical Practice: Doctors, Specialization, and Urban Change in... 228 Book Reviews The Business of Private Medical Practice: Doctors, Specialization, and Urban Change in Philadelphia, 1900–1940 By James A. Schafer Jr. (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2014) (250 pages; $72.00 cloth, $32.95 paper) Using Philadelphia as a case study, James A. Schafer takes as premise that private (unsalaried) medical practitioners in the period of study behaved as entrepreneurs, making decisions based mainly, if not entirely, on a desire to earn money. He pays particular attention to several key decisions—do an internship or not (before it was required); pursue a specialty or do general medicine; set up shop in the downtown, a suburb, or an older city neighbor - hood. The author quite properly seeks to place private practice “in the context of urban change and social inequality in American history” (p. 8). He focuses on the period 1900 to 1940, with 1920 as a sort of pivot point, because 1920 marked a shift in Philadelphia “from foreign to domestic immigration as the source of population growth,” and also because (he believes) 1920 “marked the acceleration of changes” in the career of Philadelphia doctors as more and more became specialists and also “associated their businesses and careers with http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Business of Private Medical Practice: Doctors, Specialization, and Urban Change in Philadelphia, 1900–1940

Nursing History Review , Volume 26 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 2018

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.26.1.228
Publisher site
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Abstract

228 Book Reviews The Business of Private Medical Practice: Doctors, Specialization, and Urban Change in Philadelphia, 1900–1940 By James A. Schafer Jr. (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2014) (250 pages; $72.00 cloth, $32.95 paper) Using Philadelphia as a case study, James A. Schafer takes as premise that private (unsalaried) medical practitioners in the period of study behaved as entrepreneurs, making decisions based mainly, if not entirely, on a desire to earn money. He pays particular attention to several key decisions—do an internship or not (before it was required); pursue a specialty or do general medicine; set up shop in the downtown, a suburb, or an older city neighbor - hood. The author quite properly seeks to place private practice “in the context of urban change and social inequality in American history” (p. 8). He focuses on the period 1900 to 1940, with 1920 as a sort of pivot point, because 1920 marked a shift in Philadelphia “from foreign to domestic immigration as the source of population growth,” and also because (he believes) 1920 “marked the acceleration of changes” in the career of Philadelphia doctors as more and more became specialists and also “associated their businesses and careers with

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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