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The Alaskan Influenza Epidemic, 1918 to 1919

The Alaskan Influenza Epidemic, 1918 to 1919 The Alaskan Influenza Epidemic, 1918 to 1919 Maria Gilson DeValpine James Madison University Arlene W. Keeling University of Virginia The influenza epidemic reached Alaska through the regular channels of transportation and affected practically all of the coast of Alaska. . . . Those most affected were the natives. . . . We have at one place alone 90 orphans . . . I have authorized the sending of relief expeditions for the gathering up of these orphans . . . I have authorized the purchase of provisions for the indi- gent natives because they are not allowed to travel and trap . . . as a matter of fact, most of them are dead. I have authorized $107,000. The territory had a small fund of $5,000 for the control of epidemics but that was gone in no time at all. If it were merely for the relief of the white population, I should not come to Congress for one cent . . . but when it comes to what we consider wards of the Nation, who are not taxpayers and who, in other parts of the U.S. are attended to by the government, I consider that our small treasury http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

The Alaskan Influenza Epidemic, 1918 to 1919

Nursing History Review , Volume 30 (1): 18 – Jan 28, 2022

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2022 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.30.26
Publisher site
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Abstract

The Alaskan Influenza Epidemic, 1918 to 1919 Maria Gilson DeValpine James Madison University Arlene W. Keeling University of Virginia The influenza epidemic reached Alaska through the regular channels of transportation and affected practically all of the coast of Alaska. . . . Those most affected were the natives. . . . We have at one place alone 90 orphans . . . I have authorized the sending of relief expeditions for the gathering up of these orphans . . . I have authorized the purchase of provisions for the indi- gent natives because they are not allowed to travel and trap . . . as a matter of fact, most of them are dead. I have authorized $107,000. The territory had a small fund of $5,000 for the control of epidemics but that was gone in no time at all. If it were merely for the relief of the white population, I should not come to Congress for one cent . . . but when it comes to what we consider wards of the Nation, who are not taxpayers and who, in other parts of the U.S. are attended to by the government, I consider that our small treasury

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 28, 2022

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