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The Aging of the Nurse Workforce: Recent Trends and Future Challenges

The Aging of the Nurse Workforce: Recent Trends and Future Challenges Section II: Nurses, Dentists, and Physicians— Trends and Strategies for Training CHAPTER 4 The Aging of the Nurse Workforce Recent Trends and Future Challenges Joanne Spetz Over the past 8 years, there have been widespread reports of a shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in the United States (Gurnon, 1997; Kilborn, 1999; Buerhaus, 1998). While there are a variety of causes of the nursing shortage, there is widespread agreement that the aging of the nurse workforce will drive continuing shortages of RNs (Buerhaus, Staiger, & Auerbach, 2000a; Coffman & Spetz, 1999; Letvak, 2002b). Registered nurses constitute the single largest occupation in the health care industry (Cooper, 2003; Coffman, Spetz, Seago, Rosenoff, & O’Neil, 2001). They play a critical role in the provision of health care because their scope of practice places them in direct contact with patients in most health care environments. Patients rely on nurses to assess, treat, and monitor their diseases and conditions and to educate them about maintaining health and managing chronic illness. As the nursing shortage deepens, access to and quality of health care for Americans will be in jeopardy (Buerhaus, Staiger, & Auerbach, 2000b). Reports of nursing shortages in the United States have arisen regularly http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

The Aging of the Nurse Workforce: Recent Trends and Future Challenges

Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics , Volume 25 (1): 23 – Jan 1, 2005

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.25.1.65
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Section II: Nurses, Dentists, and Physicians— Trends and Strategies for Training CHAPTER 4 The Aging of the Nurse Workforce Recent Trends and Future Challenges Joanne Spetz Over the past 8 years, there have been widespread reports of a shortage of registered nurses (RNs) in the United States (Gurnon, 1997; Kilborn, 1999; Buerhaus, 1998). While there are a variety of causes of the nursing shortage, there is widespread agreement that the aging of the nurse workforce will drive continuing shortages of RNs (Buerhaus, Staiger, & Auerbach, 2000a; Coffman & Spetz, 1999; Letvak, 2002b). Registered nurses constitute the single largest occupation in the health care industry (Cooper, 2003; Coffman, Spetz, Seago, Rosenoff, & O’Neil, 2001). They play a critical role in the provision of health care because their scope of practice places them in direct contact with patients in most health care environments. Patients rely on nurses to assess, treat, and monitor their diseases and conditions and to educate them about maintaining health and managing chronic illness. As the nursing shortage deepens, access to and quality of health care for Americans will be in jeopardy (Buerhaus, Staiger, & Auerbach, 2000b). Reports of nursing shortages in the United States have arisen regularly

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2005

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