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Still a Man’s World: Men Who Do Women’s Work

Still a Man’s World: Men Who Do Women’s Work caused by chronic Hepatitis B. His history, community ties, and cultural background mandate that his family be induded in the planning ofhis care, yet the medical personnei were ill prepared to do so. Mr. L.'s cultural belief dictated that the removal or loss ofany body part would complicate the passage of the individual's spirit into the afterworld. Until his health care providers understood and accepted the relevance of this cultural belief, care for Mr. L. was limited and hopes of a positive outcome for him diminished. In the final chapter, "lrnplications for Health Professions," O'Comor offers health are prwiders insights and ideas in approaching cultural diversity in health care. The author concludes that health professionals and patients will benefit from a *reframing of the customary provider-patient relationship to recognize patients' authorimtive agency and engage it as a resource in identi- fying and working towards common goals." The strength of Heding Traditions lies in its comprehensive review of the multiple disciplines' treatment of the subject as we11 as the meminingfd case study of the Hmong people. The book is well documented and provides useful tools for the hedth care professional in rhe Appendix. The book contains much information that at http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Still a Man’s World: Men Who Do Women’s Work

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.152
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

caused by chronic Hepatitis B. His history, community ties, and cultural background mandate that his family be induded in the planning ofhis care, yet the medical personnei were ill prepared to do so. Mr. L.'s cultural belief dictated that the removal or loss ofany body part would complicate the passage of the individual's spirit into the afterworld. Until his health care providers understood and accepted the relevance of this cultural belief, care for Mr. L. was limited and hopes of a positive outcome for him diminished. In the final chapter, "lrnplications for Health Professions," O'Comor offers health are prwiders insights and ideas in approaching cultural diversity in health care. The author concludes that health professionals and patients will benefit from a *reframing of the customary provider-patient relationship to recognize patients' authorimtive agency and engage it as a resource in identi- fying and working towards common goals." The strength of Heding Traditions lies in its comprehensive review of the multiple disciplines' treatment of the subject as we11 as the meminingfd case study of the Hmong people. The book is well documented and provides useful tools for the hedth care professional in rhe Appendix. The book contains much information that at

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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