Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Social Isolation, Loneliness, and Physical and Mental Health Among Black Older Adults

Social Isolation, Loneliness, and Physical and Mental Health Among Black Older Adults Social isolation and loneliness are consistently associated with worse health and well-being outcomes among older adults. However, many studies have not examined their concurrent impact on health and well-being, and even fewer studies examine their influence among Black older adults. The 2014 and 2016 waves of the Health and Retirement Study were used to examine the influence of social isolation and loneliness among a nationally representative sample of Black older adults. Social isolation was measured using a social network index based on marital and household status, contact with family members and friends, and participation in social and religious activities. Loneliness was measured by the 3-item loneliness scale. Health outcomes were self-rated physical health and number of chronic health conditions, depressive symptoms, and lifetime occurrence of a psychiatric disorder. Each health outcome was examined using: (a) social isolation, (b) loneliness, and (c) social isolation and loneliness, controlling for sociodemographic covariates. Social isolation was associated with self-rated health and depressive symptoms, while loneliness was associated with all health outcomes. When examined jointly, social isolation was associated with self-rated health, while loneliness was associated with all health outcomes. Study findings suggest that due to its association with multiple physical and mental health measures, loneliness may be a more significant factor for health that should be routinely assessed in working with Black older adults. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics Springer Publishing

Social Isolation, Loneliness, and Physical and Mental Health Among Black Older Adults

Annual Review of Gerontology & Geriatrics , Volume 41 (1): 22 – Feb 1, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/social-isolation-loneliness-and-physical-and-mental-health-among-black-cGWEE0nirW
Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2022 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
0198-8794
eISSN
1944-4036
DOI
10.1891/0198-8794.41.123
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Social isolation and loneliness are consistently associated with worse health and well-being outcomes among older adults. However, many studies have not examined their concurrent impact on health and well-being, and even fewer studies examine their influence among Black older adults. The 2014 and 2016 waves of the Health and Retirement Study were used to examine the influence of social isolation and loneliness among a nationally representative sample of Black older adults. Social isolation was measured using a social network index based on marital and household status, contact with family members and friends, and participation in social and religious activities. Loneliness was measured by the 3-item loneliness scale. Health outcomes were self-rated physical health and number of chronic health conditions, depressive symptoms, and lifetime occurrence of a psychiatric disorder. Each health outcome was examined using: (a) social isolation, (b) loneliness, and (c) social isolation and loneliness, controlling for sociodemographic covariates. Social isolation was associated with self-rated health and depressive symptoms, while loneliness was associated with all health outcomes. When examined jointly, social isolation was associated with self-rated health, while loneliness was associated with all health outcomes. Study findings suggest that due to its association with multiple physical and mental health measures, loneliness may be a more significant factor for health that should be routinely assessed in working with Black older adults.

Journal

Annual Review of Gerontology & GeriatricsSpringer Publishing

Published: Feb 1, 2022

References