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Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired: Black Women’s Health Activism in America, 1890-1950

Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired: Black Women’s Health Activism in America, 1890-1950 Book Reviews cannot be denied. Goodman-Draper's lack of attention to these issues leaves a gap that needs to be addressed. Goodman-Draper's rexr is referenced we11 and includes a variety of landmark publications on the subject, although secondary sources are cited more often than would beexpkcced in such a work. This is partidarly'in regard to the history of evolution of professional nurses as a labor force. Despite these limitations, the author provides aprovocativc discussion of the emergence and organization of nursing as labor, and a unique and well-grounded approach to varying ideas of *proftssionaIm and the strategies used by nurses to gain status and control over their work. The emphasis on social theory to examine "professional" status provides inrriguing insights into the complex relation- ships that exist between "professions" and such entities as labor unions and collective bargaining units. Such organizations are often considered to be antithetid to the nouon of a "profession," yet Goodman-Draper provides compelling arguments for alternate conceptualizations. Her contribution to discussions ofthe status of nursing makes this book worthwhile reading for any educator, historian, or practitioner of nursing who has struggled with the tension between these entities and professional identity, or who desires social and theorerid http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired: Black Women’s Health Activism in America, 1890-1950

Nursing History Review , Volume 6 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 1998

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.6.1.157
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Book Reviews cannot be denied. Goodman-Draper's lack of attention to these issues leaves a gap that needs to be addressed. Goodman-Draper's rexr is referenced we11 and includes a variety of landmark publications on the subject, although secondary sources are cited more often than would beexpkcced in such a work. This is partidarly'in regard to the history of evolution of professional nurses as a labor force. Despite these limitations, the author provides aprovocativc discussion of the emergence and organization of nursing as labor, and a unique and well-grounded approach to varying ideas of *proftssionaIm and the strategies used by nurses to gain status and control over their work. The emphasis on social theory to examine "professional" status provides inrriguing insights into the complex relation- ships that exist between "professions" and such entities as labor unions and collective bargaining units. Such organizations are often considered to be antithetid to the nouon of a "profession," yet Goodman-Draper provides compelling arguments for alternate conceptualizations. Her contribution to discussions ofthe status of nursing makes this book worthwhile reading for any educator, historian, or practitioner of nursing who has struggled with the tension between these entities and professional identity, or who desires social and theorerid

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 1998

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