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Reweaving a Tapestry of Care: Religion, Nursing, and the Meaning of Hospice, 1945–1978

Reweaving a Tapestry of Care: Religion, Nursing, and the Meaning of Hospice, 1945–1978 P1: OSO/OVY P2: OSO/OVY QC: OSO/OVY T1: OSO SVNF004-08 SVNF004-v4 August 24, 2006 9:6 Reweaving a Tapestry of Care: Religion, Nursing, and the Meaning of Hospice, 1945–1978 Joy Buck University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing ... people who have worked in general and chronic wards do seem to think it is rather epoch-making that every one of our patients looks peaceful, contented, and free from pain, whenever they come round the hospice. I do not pretend for a moment that [it] is my work... . Of course, most of the work is just the good nursing. When British physician Cicely Saunders wrote those words to a colleague, she was in the process of blending the religious roots of hospice with an academic model of clinical research on pain control for terminally ill cancer patients at St. Joseph’s Hospice in London. In preparation for building St. Christopher’s, a hospice of her own, she wrote a series of letters to physicians in the United States to learn more about how Americans cared for terminally ill cancer patients. In 1963, Saunders made the first of many trips to the United States to visit medical centers and universities across the country and to http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Reweaving a Tapestry of Care: Religion, Nursing, and the Meaning of Hospice, 1945–1978

Nursing History Review , Volume 15 (1): 33 – Sep 1, 2007

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.15.113
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

P1: OSO/OVY P2: OSO/OVY QC: OSO/OVY T1: OSO SVNF004-08 SVNF004-v4 August 24, 2006 9:6 Reweaving a Tapestry of Care: Religion, Nursing, and the Meaning of Hospice, 1945–1978 Joy Buck University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing ... people who have worked in general and chronic wards do seem to think it is rather epoch-making that every one of our patients looks peaceful, contented, and free from pain, whenever they come round the hospice. I do not pretend for a moment that [it] is my work... . Of course, most of the work is just the good nursing. When British physician Cicely Saunders wrote those words to a colleague, she was in the process of blending the religious roots of hospice with an academic model of clinical research on pain control for terminally ill cancer patients at St. Joseph’s Hospice in London. In preparation for building St. Christopher’s, a hospice of her own, she wrote a series of letters to physicians in the United States to learn more about how Americans cared for terminally ill cancer patients. In 1963, Saunders made the first of many trips to the United States to visit medical centers and universities across the country and to

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 1, 2007

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