Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Revisiting the 1925 Johns Report on African-American Nurses

Revisiting the 1925 Johns Report on African-American Nurses Revisiting the 1925 Johns Repoa on %an- American Nurses JUDITH YOUNC; Toronto, Ontario In 1925 the Rockefeller Foundation surveyed conditions of training and employ- ment for African-American nurses in the United States. The fbundation was interesd in supporting nurse training for African-American women: che survey, according to official Rockefeller records, would provide information on which to base future decisions.' Ethel Johns, a Canadian nurse recently hired by the foundation for work in Europe, was assigned the project and given 4 months M ulmplete her survey, Johns submined her report, "A Study of the Present Status of the Negro Woman in Nursing,* to rhe Rockefeller Foundation in December 1925.' For the next 50 ym, an aura of secrecy surrounded its contents? Leaders in nursing and the Aftlcan-American community were certainly aware of the report's existence, but it was never published or circulated outside the Rockefeller It was left to historian DarIene Clark Hine to provide the first historicaI andysis in 1 982.5 Johns, said Hine, had done "her work tm well."6 The report provided stark evidence of the plight of African-American nurses, and Rockefeller oficials, overcome by the evidence facing them and the complex U.S. racial siruation, chose inaction. An http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Revisiting the 1925 Johns Report on African-American Nurses

Nursing History Review , Volume 13 (1): 23 – Jan 1, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer-publishing/revisiting-the-1925-johns-report-on-african-american-nurses-X00pI1xOAT
Publisher
Springer Publishing
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.13.1.77
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Revisiting the 1925 Johns Repoa on %an- American Nurses JUDITH YOUNC; Toronto, Ontario In 1925 the Rockefeller Foundation surveyed conditions of training and employ- ment for African-American nurses in the United States. The fbundation was interesd in supporting nurse training for African-American women: che survey, according to official Rockefeller records, would provide information on which to base future decisions.' Ethel Johns, a Canadian nurse recently hired by the foundation for work in Europe, was assigned the project and given 4 months M ulmplete her survey, Johns submined her report, "A Study of the Present Status of the Negro Woman in Nursing,* to rhe Rockefeller Foundation in December 1925.' For the next 50 ym, an aura of secrecy surrounded its contents? Leaders in nursing and the Aftlcan-American community were certainly aware of the report's existence, but it was never published or circulated outside the Rockefeller It was left to historian DarIene Clark Hine to provide the first historicaI andysis in 1 982.5 Johns, said Hine, had done "her work tm well."6 The report provided stark evidence of the plight of African-American nurses, and Rockefeller oficials, overcome by the evidence facing them and the complex U.S. racial siruation, chose inaction. An

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2005

There are no references for this article.