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Rethinking the Tulsa Race Riot

Rethinking the Tulsa Race Riot AAHN 36TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE KEYNOTE SPEECH Barbra Mann Wall University of Virginia A key component for historians to consider is the way that interpretation of particular historical events evolves over time. This article highlights an example of reinterpretation of my own scholarship by considering how Black self- empowerment and activism can be an important part of nursing history. Recent work by historians of nursing are beginning to examine Black nurses during periods of conflict and contestations. Sandra B. Lewenson wrote about Black nurses in the American Red Cross. Karen Flynn’s Moving Beyond Borders: A History of Black Canadian and Caribbean Women in the Diaspora, recently won the Lavinia Dock Award at the American Association for the History of Nursing. Kylie Smith’s research on the history of psychiatric nurs- ing reveals how understanding a history of racism helps explain current health disparities. And PhD students of nursing history at the University of Virginia and the University of Pennsylvania are expanding our knowledge of Black nurses in a variety of venues. I have written extensively on White nurses in disasters in Alaska, Texas, and Oklahoma, but my main focus was on the Red Cross experience. I was interested in what the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Rethinking the Tulsa Race Riot

Nursing History Review , Volume 29 (1): 14 – Dec 24, 2020

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.29.9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AAHN 36TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE KEYNOTE SPEECH Barbra Mann Wall University of Virginia A key component for historians to consider is the way that interpretation of particular historical events evolves over time. This article highlights an example of reinterpretation of my own scholarship by considering how Black self- empowerment and activism can be an important part of nursing history. Recent work by historians of nursing are beginning to examine Black nurses during periods of conflict and contestations. Sandra B. Lewenson wrote about Black nurses in the American Red Cross. Karen Flynn’s Moving Beyond Borders: A History of Black Canadian and Caribbean Women in the Diaspora, recently won the Lavinia Dock Award at the American Association for the History of Nursing. Kylie Smith’s research on the history of psychiatric nurs- ing reveals how understanding a history of racism helps explain current health disparities. And PhD students of nursing history at the University of Virginia and the University of Pennsylvania are expanding our knowledge of Black nurses in a variety of venues. I have written extensively on White nurses in disasters in Alaska, Texas, and Oklahoma, but my main focus was on the Red Cross experience. I was interested in what the

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Dec 24, 2020

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