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Relationship Building in Cohort-Based Instruction: Implications for Rehabilitation Counselor Pedagogy and Professional Development

Relationship Building in Cohort-Based Instruction: Implications for Rehabilitation Counselor... Background Graduate studies in rehabilitation counseling present a variety of social, academic, and professional demands. To date, previous research has largely neglected the role that relationships among students that can help in addressing these demands. Objective The present exploratory study examined how relationships formed during a Master's Rehabilitation Counseling Education (RCE) specialization program enhanced the experience of participants both during their studies and following graduation. Methods A total of 33 graduates of a cohort-based, Cognitive Disabilities Certificate (CDC) program were asked to reflect on the impacts of relationship-building on their experiences as students as well as their post-CDC professional development. Results were examined through phenomenological qualitative data analysis. Results Participant responses revealed relationships as cohort members formed during graduate studies enhanced their student experience with facilitating camaraderie, enhancing learning, promoting student success, and providing employment leads. With regard to professional development, participants indicated their cohort-based relationships enhanced professional development, provided resources, and facilitated professional collaboration. Conclusion The benefits of cohort-based relationship building that began during graduate education extended beyond into the professional careers of participants. More use of cohort-based instruction in RCE programs may be more likely to facilitate productive and supportive relationships. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Rehabilitation Research, Policy and Education Springer Publishing

Relationship Building in Cohort-Based Instruction: Implications for Rehabilitation Counselor Pedagogy and Professional Development

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2021 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
2168-6653
eISSN
2168-6661
DOI
10.1891/re-19-30
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Graduate studies in rehabilitation counseling present a variety of social, academic, and professional demands. To date, previous research has largely neglected the role that relationships among students that can help in addressing these demands. Objective The present exploratory study examined how relationships formed during a Master's Rehabilitation Counseling Education (RCE) specialization program enhanced the experience of participants both during their studies and following graduation. Methods A total of 33 graduates of a cohort-based, Cognitive Disabilities Certificate (CDC) program were asked to reflect on the impacts of relationship-building on their experiences as students as well as their post-CDC professional development. Results were examined through phenomenological qualitative data analysis. Results Participant responses revealed relationships as cohort members formed during graduate studies enhanced their student experience with facilitating camaraderie, enhancing learning, promoting student success, and providing employment leads. With regard to professional development, participants indicated their cohort-based relationships enhanced professional development, provided resources, and facilitated professional collaboration. Conclusion The benefits of cohort-based relationship building that began during graduate education extended beyond into the professional careers of participants. More use of cohort-based instruction in RCE programs may be more likely to facilitate productive and supportive relationships.

Journal

Rehabilitation Research, Policy and EducationSpringer Publishing

Published: Mar 26, 2021

References