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Red, White, and Black: The Debate over the Active Service of Black Nurses in the United States during the First World War

Red, White, and Black: The Debate over the Active Service of Black Nurses in the United States... HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT Red, White, and Black: The Debate over the Active Service of Black Nurses in the United States during the First World War Ella St. George Carey University of Oxford Recently our President said in his wonderful masterpiece that the world must be made safe for democracy. Whether he meant to include us or not makes no difference; we are included and there is no power outside of ourselves that can keep us from sharing with the rest of mankind the liberty and freedom for which democracy stands. —Adah B. Thoms, cofounder of the National Association of the Color ed Graduate Nurses, August 1917 Taking to the stage in 1917, at the National Medical Association Conference, held that year in South Philadelphia, Adah B. Thoms articulated her vision for the true meaning of democracy in the United States of America. President Woodrow Wilson had announced earlier in April that the United States was abandoning its stance of neutrality and entering the First World War on the side of the Allied powers. Thoms was frustrated that despite the lingua franca of patriotic service surrounding the war, the U.S. government still refused to let Black nurses enroll in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Red, White, and Black: The Debate over the Active Service of Black Nurses in the United States during the First World War

Nursing History Review , Volume 30 (1): 14 – Jan 28, 2022

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2022 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.30.119
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT Red, White, and Black: The Debate over the Active Service of Black Nurses in the United States during the First World War Ella St. George Carey University of Oxford Recently our President said in his wonderful masterpiece that the world must be made safe for democracy. Whether he meant to include us or not makes no difference; we are included and there is no power outside of ourselves that can keep us from sharing with the rest of mankind the liberty and freedom for which democracy stands. —Adah B. Thoms, cofounder of the National Association of the Color ed Graduate Nurses, August 1917 Taking to the stage in 1917, at the National Medical Association Conference, held that year in South Philadelphia, Adah B. Thoms articulated her vision for the true meaning of democracy in the United States of America. President Woodrow Wilson had announced earlier in April that the United States was abandoning its stance of neutrality and entering the First World War on the side of the Allied powers. Thoms was frustrated that despite the lingua franca of patriotic service surrounding the war, the U.S. government still refused to let Black nurses enroll in

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 28, 2022

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