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Race and Place in Virginia: The Case of Nursing

Race and Place in Virginia: The Case of Nursing VictoriaTucker UniversityofVirginia This article examines contested meanings of place through a case study of the educational and professional life of Mavis Claytor, the first black woman to graduatefromtheUniversityofVirginiaSchoolofNursing.¹Itdoessowithin thecontextofentrenchedracializedlegislationandgeographically-basedsocio- cultural norms, as academic and healthcare centers in Virginia transitioned from segregation to desegregation in the 1950s through the 1980s. The arti- cle seeks to understand how and why Virginia became a national site for the massive resistance movement that countered school desegregation; and how, within this context, Claytor made sense of place as she entered newly- integratedprogramsandspacesinVirginia.Historyasplacerevealshowlocal nurses’workconnectstowheretheylived,studied,andpracticed,providinga renewedlensforanalysisinnursinghistory. Virginia:APlaceofAnalysis Black nurses’ concept of place in America is manifold, and history provides a lens for illuminating this meaning. Black nurses’ experiences cannot be understood without considering the intricate interworking of American his- tory(colonialization,slavery,JimCrowlaws,massiveresistance)andacknowl- edging Virginia’s central lineage within this narrative. While Virginia shares manyfeatureswithotherstates,italsohasadistinctidentityasthesitewhere slavery began in the United States.² Historical context is situated in places such as Jamestown, where enslaved Africans grew tobacco in colonial settle- ments; in Richmond’s Lumpkin Jail, where enslaved blacks were either held, traded,orseverelypunished³;andinCharlottesville’sMonticello,ThomasJef- ferson’splantation,whereheenslavedapproximately400laborersatthisplan- tationsiteacrosshislifespan.⁴Indeed,JeffersonNotes ’s ontheStateofVirginia, NursingHistoryReview28(2020): 143–157. APublicationoftheAmericanAssociationfortheHistory ofNursing. Copyright©2020SpringerPublishingCompany. http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/1062-8061.28.143 Pdf_Folio:143 144 VictoriaTucker written approximately a decade after the Declaration of Independence, made his views known that blacks were intellectually http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Race and Place in Virginia: The Case of Nursing

Nursing History Review , Volume 28 (1): 15 – Sep 19, 2019

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.28.143
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Abstract

VictoriaTucker UniversityofVirginia This article examines contested meanings of place through a case study of the educational and professional life of Mavis Claytor, the first black woman to graduatefromtheUniversityofVirginiaSchoolofNursing.¹Itdoessowithin thecontextofentrenchedracializedlegislationandgeographically-basedsocio- cultural norms, as academic and healthcare centers in Virginia transitioned from segregation to desegregation in the 1950s through the 1980s. The arti- cle seeks to understand how and why Virginia became a national site for the massive resistance movement that countered school desegregation; and how, within this context, Claytor made sense of place as she entered newly- integratedprogramsandspacesinVirginia.Historyasplacerevealshowlocal nurses’workconnectstowheretheylived,studied,andpracticed,providinga renewedlensforanalysisinnursinghistory. Virginia:APlaceofAnalysis Black nurses’ concept of place in America is manifold, and history provides a lens for illuminating this meaning. Black nurses’ experiences cannot be understood without considering the intricate interworking of American his- tory(colonialization,slavery,JimCrowlaws,massiveresistance)andacknowl- edging Virginia’s central lineage within this narrative. While Virginia shares manyfeatureswithotherstates,italsohasadistinctidentityasthesitewhere slavery began in the United States.² Historical context is situated in places such as Jamestown, where enslaved Africans grew tobacco in colonial settle- ments; in Richmond’s Lumpkin Jail, where enslaved blacks were either held, traded,orseverelypunished³;andinCharlottesville’sMonticello,ThomasJef- ferson’splantation,whereheenslavedapproximately400laborersatthisplan- tationsiteacrosshislifespan.⁴Indeed,JeffersonNotes ’s ontheStateofVirginia, NursingHistoryReview28(2020): 143–157. APublicationoftheAmericanAssociationfortheHistory ofNursing. Copyright©2020SpringerPublishingCompany. http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/1062-8061.28.143 Pdf_Folio:143 144 VictoriaTucker written approximately a decade after the Declaration of Independence, made his views known that blacks were intellectually

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Sep 19, 2019

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