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Publish or Perish—and Your Peril

Publish or Perish—and Your Peril EDITOR’S NOTE We have all heard about the dangerousness of predatory publishers: those that promise immediate, peer-reviewed publication of any manuscript on any sub - ject just for the payment of a “small” (and, in reality, not so small) fee. The pressure in global academia, especially the new pressure to publish in English language journals, has given rise to commercial publishers literally inventing journals to meet this need. Almost every day we are all inundated with notices of new journals (many with names that seem eerily familiar) that are looking to publish or reprint our scholarship. Do we really have the energy to - con centrate on differentiating Research on Health and Nursing from Research on Nursing and Health, a prestigious peer reviewed journal edited by Eileen Lake? The name predatory accurately reflects the way these for-profit publishers prey on the pressures academics experience on an almost daily basis. For the last several years, editors of nursing journals have been steadfastly campaigning to ensure that scholars in the discipline and, as importantly, their students do not fall prey to the sophisticated snares of predatory publish - ers. We have written editorials, spoken at conferences, and counselled new authors. I http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nursing History Review Springer Publishing

Publish or Perish—and Your Peril

Nursing History Review , Volume 27 (1): 3 – Jan 1, 2019

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Publisher
Springer Publishing
Copyright
© 2020 Springer Publishing Company
ISSN
1062-8061
eISSN
1938-1913
DOI
10.1891/1062-8061.27.12
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

EDITOR’S NOTE We have all heard about the dangerousness of predatory publishers: those that promise immediate, peer-reviewed publication of any manuscript on any sub - ject just for the payment of a “small” (and, in reality, not so small) fee. The pressure in global academia, especially the new pressure to publish in English language journals, has given rise to commercial publishers literally inventing journals to meet this need. Almost every day we are all inundated with notices of new journals (many with names that seem eerily familiar) that are looking to publish or reprint our scholarship. Do we really have the energy to - con centrate on differentiating Research on Health and Nursing from Research on Nursing and Health, a prestigious peer reviewed journal edited by Eileen Lake? The name predatory accurately reflects the way these for-profit publishers prey on the pressures academics experience on an almost daily basis. For the last several years, editors of nursing journals have been steadfastly campaigning to ensure that scholars in the discipline and, as importantly, their students do not fall prey to the sophisticated snares of predatory publish - ers. We have written editorials, spoken at conferences, and counselled new authors. I

Journal

Nursing History ReviewSpringer Publishing

Published: Jan 1, 2019

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